Intelligence pathway

In the Intelligence pathway, your training and development will be tailored for you to kick off your career in one of the three Defence Intelligence Agencies.

We seek applications from graduates of all disciplines, because it is ultimately the combination of your skills and qualifications, in conjunction with your diverse experiences and aptitude for analysis, technology, innovation, critical thinking and/or problem solving that will propel you into your future career in the national security environment.

Development programs

Graduates undertake work that contributes to Australia’s national security from day one with entry through any of the following three challenging and unique graduate training paths.

Graduate stories

Kirsten

Kirsten

I joined ASD as a Cyber and Information Security Analyst after studying Mechatronics and Computer Science. While I always knew I wanted to work with computers, of all the choices available to me at the completion of my degree, Intelligence and Security seemed to offer the most challenging and rewarding opportunities.

Within ASD, I've had the opportunity to use broad engineering principles and practices, as well as specific knowledge from my Computer Science background to tackle problems.

As a Cyber grad within ASD, I've had the opportunity to undertake a number of rotations, in particular a rotation within ASD's malware analysis team. I was a little worried about the challenge, but the team was very welcoming and ready to help me learn the ropes.

I’ve had the opportunity to directly analyse infectious malware, to develop tools to help more rapidly identify and understand cyber threats, and to work with a team in a very challenging area. My assessment on the capabilities and threats posed by a given virus have contributed to the security of the Australian Government networks.

Moving to Canberra, I was worried about not knowing anyone. However, within a week, I’d made more friends than I had in a year – all fellow incoming grads. Those friends were the best support I could have hoped for entering the world of ASD.

Scott

Scott

I work in a fast-paced operational team, so we typically start the day at 0700 - the benefits of flextime mean if you start early, you can leave early, and if not, you can accumulate flex and leave early another day or take a whole day off.

DIO’s culture is really warm and welcoming. Everyone here is so friendly and eager to help you progress professionally and personally. It’s also a massive plus that everyone here seems to love food and baking – morning teas can both be a blessing when you haven’t had breakfast, and a curse when you have inhaled a whole tray of brownies.

Our work is done in support of ADF operations, which is really interesting because you get to work with uniformed personnel and get an understanding of what happens at the tactical level (and also hear cool deployment stories). I often liaise with our counterparts out at Headquarters Joint Operations Command and the Office of National Intelligence. 

In my team, we have a mix of weekly set tasks and ad hoc tasking. Short turn-around tasking tends to ebb and flow depending on whether there is a hot topic. My team is generally quite happy for me to independently take on tasks, which has enabled me to experience a range of things like drafting products, contributing to meetings with international partners, running tradecraft sessions and briefing seniors.

I have made a lot of new friends since being at DIO, both grads and non-grads. It’s been great meeting the grads and ex-grads from around Defence who have had difference experiences both from a general friendship perspective as well as getting to know wider Defence. I think it’s especially good to have friends in our workplace whom you can lean on and talk to about your work with when things get challenging. I’ve also been able to develop mentor-type relationships with more experienced colleagues.

James

James

After completing my studies in Geomatics Engineering, I joined the Intelligence and Security Development Program as an AGO Technologist in 2014. The AGO graduate program has provided a great opportunity for me to broaden my skill sets and knowledge beyond my academic studies.

Although I was in the Technologist stream, I had the opportunity to complete the Geospatial Intelligence Analysis Course, which I felt allowed me to adapt my pre-existing knowledge to Defence applications while gaining an insight into the complete suite of work conducted by AGO.

Rotations in the Technologist stream have provided me with project management and software development skills which allowed me to engage with different aspects of my university studies. From my experience, the graduate program is designed to provide a working environment where on-the-job training and team assistance is core to daily operations.

As expected when starting any new job, I was initially nervous but this was quickly overcome by friendly military and civilian colleagues who adopt and live the AGO culture. This culture provides a safe environment to learn, to communicate and seek assistance whenever you are unsure.

AGO is an organisation which sources graduates from diverse academic backgrounds in order to provide different perspectives on a range of global issues. Due to the nature of the graduate program, I moved to Canberra at the e time as other graduates. As we were all new, we have had the opportunity to network, establish long-lasting friendships and enjoy Canberra’s offerings.