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Stallions have a spell


A No. 36
Squadron Stallion
on the tarmac in the
Middle East.

A No. 36 Squadron Stallion on the tarmac in the Middle East.

Australian
Joint Task Force
Commander BRIG
Peter Hutchinson
farewells CO Air Task
Group WGCDR Reece
Polmear and congratulates
the C-130H
Detachment for its outstanding
contribution.

Australian Joint Task Force Commander BRIG Peter Hutchinson farewells CO Air Task Group WGCDR Reece Polmear and congratulates the C-130H Detachment for its outstanding contribution.

THE distinctive camouflaged colours of the two C-130H aircraft maintaining vital logistic and transport support for all Australian forces deployed in the Middle East is now absent from Iraq’s skies.

The No. 36 Squadron workhorses have been replaced by C-130Js, giving the Stallions their first break from the MEAO since February 2003.

The Air Lift Group Commander, Air Commodore Greg Evans, said 36SQN would have “a spell” then its technicians and aircrew would be trained on a simulator being modified to reflect the new C-130H flight deck configuration.

The Commander of the Air Task Group, Wing Commander Reece Polmear, said the achievements of 36SQN’s C-130Hs and crews during Operations Bastille, Falconer, Slipper and Catalyst were remarkable.

“Our two C-130s represent only about 3 per cent of the total coalition C-130 presence in the MEAO, but in that great Australian tradition of punching above our weight we’ve hauled about 6 per cent of all intra-theatre C-130 cargo,” WGCDR Polmear said.

Most of the Stallions’ work was in support of the deployed Australian forces but the crews were often involved in moving stores, equipment and personnel for other coalition members.

During their deployment, 36SQN flew about 2100 sorties with more than 3500 flying hours in some of the most difficult and dangerous flying conditions in the world today.

WGCDR Polmear said although the two aircraft and their crews were the focus of the detachment, the personnel involved in keeping them flying safely were the unsung heroes.

“Everyone from ground crews, mechanics, planners and the many other support staff involved in flying operations and supporting the detachment worked tirelessly to ensure we achieved our assigned missions. Their efforts are a tribute to the skills, values and ethos of the Air Force and ADF.”

 

 

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