Australian Government: Department of Defence
Defence Capability Plan 2009 - Public Version
     
 
 

Planning for Capabilities Beyond 2013

The 2009 White Paper is the Government’s comprehensive plan for Defence for the next 20 years. The primary outcome is to build Force 2030, and remediate the current and projected force, required for the defence of Australia and its approaches, and in relation to our unique strategic interests. The capabilities outlined in the White Paper will create one of the most capable Defence forces in our region, with the world’s best people, equipment and support systems.

While the Government has decided that this Public DCP 2009 will set out the expenditures we expect over the next four years, significant commitments have been made in the White Paper to Australia’s future military capabilities beyond this period.

Some projects related to these capabilities are not included in this DCP, however, Defence may be conducting capability development activities for a number of them during the period 2009-2013. These activities may include: technical studies to determine capability performance requirements and to assess technical risks; simulation activities and prototype development and evaluation; market studies to determine industry capacity and technological expertise in certain areas; costing studies to develop a robust understanding of acquisition and through-life costs associated with the future capabilities, facilities and supporting infrastructure; studies into human factors and training needs analysis; and analysis and studies to develop plans for the future support services and sustainment systems.

The information gathered through these activities will inform the development of subsequent DCPs. In addition companies who are seeking to understand the longer run plans as a result of the 2009 White Paper will gain some insight through regular participation in Environmental Working Groups and other industry participation activities.

Below is a summary of some of the major programs and phases expected to be included in subsequent DCPs to meet the capability goals of the White Paper:

  • Armed Reconnaissance Helicopter Upgrades. Under AIR 87 there is likely to be a new phase (or phases) to maintain the effectiveness of the capability. This project is expected to provide system upgrades to the ARH consistent with the parent Franco/German Tiger helicopter program. These upgrades may include weapons, engines, software, aircraft mission management system and ground support system upgrades. This is likely to be an ACAT III project and Defence will commence work on developing this phase for Government consideration after 2016.
  • AEW&C Upgrades. Under AIR 5077 there are likely to be new phases to maintain the effectiveness of the capability. These phases will be informed by the studies under Phase 4. Some initial plans include developing a comprehensive AEW&C test environment for upgrading aircraft and associated support segments, and to implement and test mandatory security and interoperability upgrades to the Wedgetail AEW&C capability. There will also be a comprehensive mid-life upgrade. These phases may be up to ACAT I and Defence will commence work on developing these phases for Government consideration beyond 2019.
  • Multi-mission Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (MUAV). AIR 7000 Phase 1B is intending to acquire a High-Altitude Long-Endurance (HALE) Maritime Unmanned Aerial System (MUAS) capable of maritime and overland Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) roles and Electronic Support (ES). This is likely to be an ACAT II project and Defence will commence work on developing this phase for Government consideration beyond 2019.
  • Military Satellite Communications. Recent and planned phases of JP 2008 are providing a comprehensive satellite communications (SATCOM) capability to support ADF operations. One additional phase is being considered to deliver an ADF Ultra-High Frequency (UHF) SATCOM capability providing coverage in the Pacific Ocean region. This is likely to be an ACAT III project and Defence will commence work on developing this phase for Government consideration after 2016.
  • ADF Joint Command Support Environment. JP 2030 continues to build upon the capability delivered under previous phases of the project. A later phase is intended to further establish the framework for the Joint Command Support Environment to consolidate existing Command Support Systems into a single integrated environment linking all elements of the ADF. This is likely to be an ACAT III project and Defence will commence work on developing this phase for Government consideration after 2016.
  • Defence GEOINT Capabilities. JP 2044 is a multi-phased proposal designed to develop and sustain a Defence capability to exploit geospatial data gathered from multiple sources including space-based surveillance. Later phases of this project will seek to further enhance the overall capability and enable Defence to maintain high level technology and effectiveness in this enterprise. These are likely to be ACAT III phases and Defence will commence work on developing the first of these phases for Government consideration after 2013.
  • Strategic Sealift. A phase of JP 2048 will consider a strategic sealift capability. This capability would enable the ADF to transport bulk equipment, supplies and forces into a theatre of operations and provide significant ongoing support to deployed forces. Strategic sea lift is complementary to amphibious operations. This is likely to be an ACAT II project and Defence will commence work on developing this phase for Government consideration beyond 2019.
  • Battlespace Communications Systems (Land). A later phase of JP 2072 is intended to continue the expansion of enhanced communications to support joint operations. The phase will continue to progressively equip the remaining elements of the land force. JP 2072 is an ACAT I Program and Defence will commence work on developing this phase for Government consideration after 2016.
  • Maritime Strike Weapon for New Air Combat Capability. This new project aims to acquire a maritime strike weapon for the multi-role fighter being acquired under AIR 6000, the New Air Combat Capability. This is likely to be an ACAT III project and Defence will commence work on developing this project for Government consideration after 2016.
  • Ground Based Air Defence Enhancements or Replacement. Under LAND 19 this phase is intended to enhance or replace the existing Ground Based Air Defence (GBAD) system (RBS 70 based). It will include technologies and weapon systems that are also capable of Countering Rockets, Artillery and Mortars (CRAM). This is likely to be an ACAT II project and Defence will be developing this phase for Government consideration after 2013.
  • Army Battle Management System. LAND 75 is a multi-phase proposal to deliver a land Battle Management System (BMS). A later phase is planned to take the federated network of BMS type Command and Control systems to a common solution and provide major software releases to enhance interoperability with allied and other agency domains. This is likely to be an ACAT II phase and Defence will commence work on developing this project for Government consideration after 2016.
  • ADF Small Arms Replacement. This new project aims to replace the ADF small arms inventory. Existing upgrade programs (such as LAND 125 Phase 3) will continue development of the AUSTEYR family of weapons. As such the new small arms will not be required until beyond 2019. This is likely to be an ACAT III project and Defence will commence work on developing this phase for Government consideration beyond 2019.
  • Land Combat Vehicles. The LAND 400 project will aim to replace and enhance those combat systems currently provided by M113, ASLAV and Bushmaster. The project is likely to be split into phases to deal with vehicle classes or capabilities. This is likely to be an ACAT I Program and Defence will commence work on developing this project for Government consideration after 2016.
  • Long Range Subsurface Detection. This SEA 1100 phase intends to provide the ability to reliably and effectively employ a towed array sonar from the ANZAC Class FFHs with a high probability of deterring or detecting underwater threats at tactically useful ranges. This is likely to be an ACAT III project and Defence will commence work on developing this project for Government consideration after 2013.
  • Maritime Extended Range Air Defence. This proposed new project seeks to provide the Royal Australian Navy with an extended range air defence weapon for the Air Warfare Destroyers. This is likely to be an ACAT II project and Defence will commence work on developing this phase for Government consideration beyond 2019.
  • Maritime Operational Support Capability. This phase of SEA 1654 seeks to replace the capability provided by HMAS Success. This is likely to be an ACAT II project and Defence will commence work on developing this project for Government consideration after 2016.
  • Air Warfare Destroyer (AWD) – Strike Capability. This new phase of SEA 4000 seeks to provide an enhanced sea based long range strike capability for the HOBART Class destroyers. This is likely to be an ACAT III project and Defence will commence work on developing this phase for Government consideration beyond 2019.
  • Future Frigate. This new project SEA 5000 will introduce into service the next generation of naval surface combatants that will have a strong emphasis on anti-submarine warfare and be capable of independent and task group operations. This is likely to be an ACAT I Program and Defence will commence work on developing this project for Government consideration beyond 2019.

The White Paper also outlines the Government’s commitment to further enhance existing platforms, including:

  • ensuring that the ANZAC Class frigates continue to be able to operate effectively until they are replaced by the Future Frigates, including putting the ships through the anti-ship missile defence program, subject to successful trials in a lead ship;
  • continuing to upgrade the protection, mobility and firepower of the M113 armoured personnel carriers, some of which are already in service;
  • continuing to enhance the capabilities of the individual soldier in dismounted close combat to improve combat power, survivability, and command and control.

The Government has also made a commitment to:

  • make a substantial investment in intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities;
  • make major enhancements to Defence’s cyber warfare capability;
  • focus on strengthening the ADF’s electronic warfare capabilities;
  • enhance Defence’s joint command support system; and
  • build a networked ADF through progressively delivering networked maritime, land, air and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance domains.

In addition to the capabilities highlighted in the White Paper, there are many smaller projects and phases that together deliver many of the essential support capabilities for the ADF. These projects provide capabilities that enable other major systems to realise their full effectiveness and provide extensive opportunities for Australian small to medium enterprises.

Defence Capability Plan / 2009 / Public Version