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Annual Report 2014–15

Volume 1, Part 2 : Performance

Programme 1.3
Army Capabilities

The Chief of Army, Lieutenant General Angus Campbell, DSC, AM, is responsible and accountable to the CDF for the command of the Army and the management of designated joint functions. He oversees corporate policy formation within the Army and is responsible and accountable to the CDF and the Secretary for the effective and efficient management of the Army. He is also Defence’s principal Army adviser on strategic matters.

The Army contributes to the achievement of the Government’s defence objectives through the provision of land-based and Special Operations forces, as well as the development of enhanced joint amphibious capability. The Army also contributes to the national domestic response to terrorism, chemical, biological, radiological or explosive incidents, and other national security tasks during peacetime.

The Army’s work continues to be underpinned by its values of courage, initiative, respect and teamwork, and it remains committed to ongoing cultural renewal.

Highlights during 2014–15 included the following:

  • Globally, the Army contributed forces to new operations in Ukraine and Iraq, and maintained commitments in Afghanistan and elsewhere.
  • In the South Pacific region, the Army supported Operation Render Safe in Bougainville, locating and destroying explosive ordnance from World War II. The Army also assisted in recovery efforts in Vanuatu following Cyclone Pam.
  • In Australia, the Army supported the G20 Leaders’ Summit in Brisbane and disaster relief in Queensland.
  • The Army Reserve, a vital component of the total land force, provided formed units and individual specialists in support of both domestic contingencies and overseas operations.
  • The Army continued to support members with physical and psychological wounds and injuries, participating in a number of innovative programmes such as the Arts Recovery, Resilience, Teamwork and Skills programme and the Wounded Digger Forum.
  • The Army supported Defence’s international engagement objectives through a range of bilateral and multilateral visits, exchanges and exercises. Highlights included Exercise Southern Jackaroo (United States and Japan) and Exercise Kowari (United States and China).
  • The implementation of Plan Beersheba continued through the relocation of armoured and supporting capabilities, which contributed to the modernisation of the Army.
  • The Army achieved first pass approval from government for Project LAND 400 Phase 2, the mounted combat reconnaissance platform that will replace the Australian Light Armoured Vehicle (ASLAV) fleet.
  • Project LAND 200 Tranche 1 delivered a mounted and dismounted battle management system and a digital combat radio system to enhance mission command.
  • Project LAND 154 Phase 3A Project Ningaui delivered the Australian route clearance capability, and Joint Project 2088 Phase 1 enhanced the Army’s counter-terrorism capability.
  • The Army worked to develop the Capability Realisation Plan for delivery of the LAND 125 3B capability. The Capability Realisation Plan milestone for initial material release was achieved and initial operational capability was on schedule for the planned delivery date.
  • The Army marked the Centenary of Anzac through a series of community-oriented commemorative activities.
Table 3.10: Programme 1.3 deliverables

Deliverable

Status

Click to view the User Guide page

Key

Met

• • •

Substantially met

• •

Partially met

• •

Not met

• • •

Click to view the full user guide

Prepare, sustain and lead assigned forces to deliver capability to meet government requirements.

Status Met • • •

Conduct force generation and force preparation and maintain preparedness of capability as directed by the CDF.

Status Substantially Met • •

While the Army is able to meet the CDF’s preparedness requirements, some minor personnel and equipment issues have affected the capability of some enabling force elements. Issues are being managed to remediation.

Continue to contribute to domestic security operations.

Status Met • • •

In consultation with the Capability Development Group and the Defence Materiel Organisation, continue to plan, develop and monitor the delivery of, and transition to, new capability.

Status Met • • •

Provide timely, accurate and considered advice on Army capabilities to the Government, the CDF and the Secretary.

Status Met • • •

Continue to strengthen and improve programmes that provide support for Army’s seriously wounded and ill personnel.

Status Substantially Met • •

In the past year, the Army made substantial progress within the Support to Wounded, Injured and Ill Programme (SWIIP) domain and the development of the Transition for Employment Programme. The Diggers Forum continues to be an effective engagement activity within the SWIIP space. In addition to these key programmes, A-SWIIP continues to engage with Joint Health Command to ensure that appropriate and timely care is delivered to those in need.

Undertake joint collective training to ensure force elements are prepared for deployment.

Status Met • • •

Deliver force generation, namely a training continuum that unifies individual and collective training to ensure Defence elements are prepared for Joint Force-In-Being contributions, including joint enabling activities supporting other Services/Groups.

Status Met • • •

Implement reform through the Adaptive Army framework, the Army Continuous Modernisation Plan and the Army Plan while continuing preparation of force elements for operational commitments and contingencies (this includes the Plan Beersheba initiatives such as the forming of Multi-role Combat Brigades, an amphibious capability and reform of the Army Reserve).

Status Substantially Met • •

These are multi-year programmes that continue to be monitored.

Deliver Group-specific reform and savings without compromising agreed levels of Army capability, including the revamping of Army’s governance, risk, and budgeting and performance achievement management.

• • Status Partially Met

Throughout the year, the Army implemented organisational improvements to Army Reserves recruiting, developed a capability management support tool for the Armoured Corps Trade Model and reviewed AHQ Committee System to identify opportunities to improve governance and accountability in support of strategic decision-making.

Develop programmes to increase diversity within the Army’s workforce, including clear milestones for improving participation rates for females and Indigenous members. Specific targets have been issued by the Chief of Army, which are: women 13 per cent by July 2015, and Indigenous participation 2.7 per cent by December 2015 (this is a departmental target agreed at the Council of Australian Governments).

• • Status Partially Met

Indigenous participation within the Army is at 1.7 per cent. Programmes continue to be developed to target the complex issues surrounding Indigenous recruitment. Women’s participation is at 12 per cent and is maintaining a slow but positive trend.

Table 3.11: Programme 1.3 deliverables (rate of effort—flying hours)

Deliverable

Status

Click to view the User Guide page

Key

Met

• • •

Substantially met

• •

Partially met

• •

Not met

• • •

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6 CH-47D Chinook
1,700 hrs

Status Met • • •

7 CH-47F Chinook
0 hours

• • • •

Not applicable.

Commissioning begins from July 2015.

34 S-70A Black Hawk
5,090 hrs

Status Met • • •

41 B-206 Kiowa
6,150 hrs

• • Status Partially Met

5,043 flying hours. The Army is continuing to reduce the timeframe between trainee aircrew graduating from the Kiowa and transitioning to their operational aircraft types.

22 Armed Reconaissance Helicopter Tiger
4,726 hrs

• • Status Partially Met

3,675 flying hours. The Tiger rate of effort improved in 2014–15. Significant further work is required by Airbus Helicopters to improve turnaround times for spare parts and meet the increase in rate of effort necessary to support capability requirements.

47 MRH-90 Taipan

5,400 hrs

Status Substantially Met • •

5,308 flying hours.

Table 3.12: Programme 1.3 key performance indicators

Key performance indicator

Status

Click to view the User Guide page

Key

Met

• • •

Substantially met

• •

Partially met

• •

Not met

• • •

Click to view the full user guide

Achieve levels of preparedness as directed by the CDF.

Status Substantially Met • •

While the Army was able to meet preparedness requirements, there were some minor personnel and equipment issues that affected the capability of some enabling force elements.

Meet the Government’s operational requirements.

Status Met • • •

Generate and sustain forces for each current operation.

Status Met • • •

Achieve a level of training that maintains core skills, professional standards and baseline preparedness.

Status Met • • •

Provide timely, accurate and considered advice on Army capabilities to the Government, the CDF and the Secretary.

Status Met • • •