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Annual Report 2014–15

Volume 1, Part 3 : Governance and Accountability

Chapter 8
Reform and cultural change

Workforce summary

Defence budgets for its ADF workforce on a funded strength basis and the APS workforce on a full-time equivalent (FTE)—that is, paid—basis. Defence uses actual FTE—that is, paid strength on a particular date—as the most accurate indicator of current staffing levels. Workforce planning is based on average funded strength and FTE respectively for the financial year. These averages, while suitable for planning and budgeting purposes, are lag indicators against the actual end-of-year figures.

Defence records some statistical data by headcount; that is, all personnel are counted equally regardless of the number of hours worked, and the figures include all personnel recorded as on duty or on leave, full-time or
part-time, with or without pay. This statistical basis is used for gender information, employment categories and location. Defence does not base its workforce planning on headcount figures.

By way of comparison, ADF and APS staffing figures for 2014–15, and for 2013–14, are shown in tables 8.1 and 8.2 against the three measures.

Table 8.1: Australian Defence Force—staffing figures, 2013–14 and 2014–15

ADF staffing measure

2013–14

2014–15

Variation

For workforce planning purposes

Actual funded strength (paid strength as at 30 June)

56,922

57,718

+796

Average funded strength (over the financial year)

56,364

57,512

+1,148

For other statistical data

Permanent strength (headcount) (on duty or leave and paid or unpaid)

57,035

57,404

+369

Notes

Funded strength figures include the ADF Gap Year, which was re-introduced in 2014–15 with 219 participants. For consistency with other tables in this chapter, the headcount figures do not include the Gap Year.

Funded strength figures do not include the Reserve workforce other than those on continuous full-time service, who are paid through the same mechanism as permanent force members. For consistency with other tables in this chapter, the headcount figures do not include Reserve members.

Table 8.2: Australian Public Service—staffing figures, 2013–14 and 2014–15

APS staffing measure

2013–14

2014–15

Variation

For workforce planning purposes

Actual FTE (paid strength as at 30 June)

19,988

18,787

–1,201

Average FTE (over the financial year)

20,496

19,342

–1,154

For other statistical data

Headcount figure (on duty or leave, full-time or part-time, paid or unpaid)

21,191

19,967

–1,224

Note

Figures include both ongoing and non-ongoing APS members.

Workforce planning

This section provides information on the average workforce strength during 2014–15.

ADF permanent force

Table 8.3 details ADF permanent force average funded strength for 2014–15 and the previous year. ADF strength was 57,512 in 2014–15, an increase of 1,148 from 2013–14. This includes ADF Reservists on continuous full-time service. Average funded strength for continuous full-time service was 888 (comprising Navy 380, Army 424 and Air Force 84)—an increase of 161 from 2013–14 and the previous year.

The ADF permanent force grew significantly from 2007 to 2011 due to initiatives such as the Hardened and Networked Army, the Enhanced Land Force, the Defence Capability Plan and initiatives from the 2009 Defence White Paper, with a recruitment surge between 2007 and 2010. After peaking in 2010–11, strength trended downwards until January 2014. It has been increasing since then, and further growth towards the approved allocation is expected in future years.

Table 8.3: ADF permanent force average funded strength, 2013–14 and 2014–15

 

2013–14 actual

2014–15 budget estimate[1]

2014–15 revised estimate[2]

2014–15 actual

Variation[3]

Number %

Navy

13,862

14,318

14,125

14,070

–55

–0.4

Army

28,568

30,383

29,463

29,366

–97

–0.3

Air Force

13,934

14,138

14,100

14,076

–24

–0.2

Total average funded strength

56,364

58,839

57,688

57,512

–176

–0.3

Notes

Figures in this table are average strengths; they are not a ‘headcount’. Reservists undertaking full-time service are included in the figures. Employees on forms of leave without pay are not included.

  1. As published in the Portfolio Budget Statements 2014–15.
  2. As published in the Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements 2014–15.
  3. Figures are the difference between 2014–15 revised estimate and 2014–15 actual.

ADF enlistments and separations

The permanent ADF strength (headcount) increased by 369 in 2014–15; this figure reflects the net difference between enlistments and separations.

The ADF enlisted 5,577 permanent members, made up of 4,550 men and 1,027 women, for the 12 months to 30 June 2015. This was 777 fewer than in 2013–14.

ADF enlistments can be categorised as ab initio (those with no prior military service) or prior service enlistments. Of the 5,577 permanent members enlisted, 691 entrants had prior military service in the Reserves, the Gap Year programme, another Service or another country, or had previous permanent force service. There were 4,886 ab initio entrants.

Tables 8.4 and 8.5 provide comparative information about separations over the last two years.

Table 8.4: ADF permanent force, 12-month rolling separation rates, 30 June 2014 and 30 June 2015

 

12-month rolling separation rate (%)

 

30 June 2014

30 June 2015

Navy

8.4

7.9

Army

12.4

11.3

Air Force

5.5

5.7

Total ADF permanent force

9.7

9.1

Table 8.5: ADF permanent force separations, 2013–14 and 2014–15

Voluntary separations[1]

Involuntary separations[2]

Age
retirement

Trainee separations

Total

2013–14[3]

Navy

Officers

104

23

1

40

168

Other ranks

564

184

1

228

977

Army

Officers

212

84

11

139

446

Other ranks

1,666

872

5

564

3,107

Air Force

Officers

123

32

13

17

185

Other ranks

399

93

15

88

595

Total ADF permanent force

Officers

439

139

25

196

799

Other ranks

2,629

1,149

21

880

4,679

Total

3,068

1,288

46

1,076

5,478

2014–15

Navy

Officers

110

33

4

68

215

Other ranks

512

196

2

174

884

Army

Officers

211

77

26

154

468

Other ranks

1,427

747

10

650

2,834

Air Force

Officers

157

44

15

36

252

Other ranks

347

97

27

84

555

Total ADF permanent force

Officers

478

154

45

258

935

Other ranks

2,286

1,040

39

908

4,273

Total

2,764

1,194

84

1,166

5,208

Notes

Figures in this table show permanent force employee numbers (substantive headcount). Reserves undertaking continuous full-time service are not included. Classifications are not mutually exclusive, and an individual is placed in only one group.

The order of classifications is as follows: cadets and trainees, then age retirement; the remainder are classified as voluntary or involuntary. Employees commencing leave or leave without pay are not included.

  1. ‘Voluntary’ includes voluntary redundancies and resignations.
  2. ‘Involuntary’ primarily comprises members who are medically unfit, who are unsuitable for further duty, who died while serving or who fell into the ‘Management initiated early retirement’ category.
  3. Some 2013–14 figures have been adjusted from what was reported in the Defence Annual Report 2013–14 to account for retrospective transactions.

ADF Reserves

Table 8.6 shows the number of Reservists who rendered paid service during 2014–15 and the previous year. The number of days each Reservist works in a year can vary substantially depending on personal circumstances and organisational need.

In 2014–15, 19,362 Reservists undertook paid service, which is 379 fewer than in 2013–14. While this appears to suggest lower participation in Reserve service, it is significant that the number of Reserve members who served 20 or more days in the year increased by almost 500 over the previous financial year (the final figures for Reserve service in 2014–15 were not known at the time of publication because they are compiled as Reservists submit their attendance records, which some Reservists do only occasionally).

Table 8.6: ADF Reserve paid strength

 

2013–14 actual

2014–15 budget estimate[1]

2014–15 revised estimate[2]

2014–15 actual

Variation[3]

Number %

Navy

2,021

2,150

2,150

2,073

–77

–3.6

Army

14,662

15,250

14,200

14,301

+101

+0.7

Air Force

3,058

3,100

3,100

2,988

–112

–3.6

Total paid Reserves

19,741

20,500

19,450

19,362

–88

–0.5

Notes

As the number of days or hours worked by Reserve members can vary greatly, figures in this table are headcount rather than average strength. Reservists on full-time service in the permanent force are not included in this table: they are included in Table 8.3. Figures include the High Readiness Reserve Force, Active Reserve Force and Specialist Reserve Force.

  1. As published in the Portfolio Budget Statements 2014–15.
  2. As published in the Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements 2014–15.
  3. Figures are the difference between 2014–15 revised estimate and 2014–15 actual.

Project Suakin

The ability to attract and retain the right people, in the right numbers, is fundamental to the sustainment of the ADF’s future capability. Project Suakin has designed the ADF Total Workforce Model to support capability by enabling the ADF to draw on the skills and experience of its entire workforce in a more sophisticated and integrated way. The Total Workforce Model supports the optimal use of ADF permanent and reserve members, providing greater strategic and organisational flexibility. The Total Workforce Model will, at the same time, afford ADF members increased workplace flexibility, encouraging them to make service in the ADF a longer-term career.

During 2014–15, Project Suakin undertook a range of ‘test and learn’ activities to finalise the design of the Total Workforce Model. Amendments to Defence legislation, necessary to allow permanent ADF members access to flexible service arrangements, were introduced into Parliament in June 2015. Project Suakin also delivered new and revised policies, procedures and tools to enable the Services to begin implementation of the Total Workforce Model in 2015–16.

APS workforce

Table 8.7 shows details of the APS average strength, expressed as average FTE, for 2014–15 and the previous year. APS average strength was 19,342 in 2014–15. This was a decrease of 1,154 from the 2013–14 figure of 20,496. The decrease in 2014–15 was 1,201 FTE, from 19,988 to 18,787 (Table 8.8). The reduction was due to continuing reforms to Defence’s business practices, and will continue in 2015–16 with the implementation of the recommendations of the First Principles Review.

Table 8.7: Civilian (APS and contractor) average full-time equivalent, 2013–14 and 2014–15

 

2013–14 actual

2014–15
budget
estimate[1]

2014–15 revised estimate[2]

2014–15
actual

APS—Defence

15,280

14,883

14,426

14,861

APS—DMO

4,812

4,777

4,539

4,075

APS—DMO—ADF backfill[3]

404

432

406

406

Total APS

20,496

20,092

19,371

19,342

Defence contractors

340

445

319

350

DMO contractors

18

48

48

11

Total contractors

358

493

367

361

Total civilian workforce

20,854

20,585

19,738

19,703

Notes

These figures are average FTE; they are not a headcount.

  1. As published in the Portfolio Budget Statements 2014–15.
  2. As published in the Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements 2014–15.
  3. The DMO manages its workforce under a combined ADF, APS and contractor model. Under this arrangement, it can use funding from unfilled ADF positions to fill and resource positions with APS staff.
Table 8.8: APS end-of-year full-time equivalent, 2013–14 and 2014–15

 

2013–14 actual

2014–15 budget estimate[1]

2014–15 revised estimate[2]

2014–15 actual

Total APS

19,988

19,700

18,950

18,787

Notes

Figures in this table are actual FTE for the last payday of 2014–15. Employees on forms of leave without pay are not included. The figures differ from those in Table 8.7, as that table shows the average FTE across the full year.

  1. As published in the Portfolio Budget Statements 2014–15.
  2. As published in the Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements 2014–15.

APS recruitment and separations

Defence recruited 452 APS employees during 2014–15, including 195 as part of the graduate programme.

The APS (headcount) decreased by 1,224; this reflects the net difference between recruitment and separations. The separations are shown in Table 8.9; the majority of separations were due to resignation or retirement from Defence.

Table 8.9: APS separations, 2013–14 and 2014–15

 

Voluntary redundancy[1]

Involuntary separations[2]

Resignation/ retirement[3]

Transfers[4]

Total

2013–14

Senior Executive Service

3

7

6

16

Executive levels

66

17

252

47

382

Other staff

89

77

728

97

991

Total APS (2013–14)

158

94

987

150

1,389

2014–15

Senior Executive Service

10

8

18

Executive levels

93

18

303

42

456

Other staff

148

51

833

170

1,202

Total APS (2014–15)

241

69

1,146

220

1,676

Notes

Figures in this table show ongoing and non-ongoing employee numbers (substantive headcount).

  1. Voluntary redundancies are those that are programme initiated.
  2. Involuntary figures include breach of the Code of Conduct, invalidity retirement, involuntary redundancy, lack of qualifications, non-performance, term probation and death.
  3. Resignation/retirement figures include resignation, retirement (minimum age and Senior Executive Service) and completion of non-ongoing contract term.
  4. Transfers are those who have transferred to other government departments. Movements between Defence and DMO are not included.

Remunerating people

Summary

Defence remuneration is a key component of the Defence employment offer. It attracts people to join Defence, develop personally and professionally, and choose to stay. The offer provides for fair and competitive remuneration, consistent with the parameters laid down by government.

The distinct features of the ADF and APS remuneration structures are explained further in this section.

ADF remuneration

The independent Defence Force Remuneration Tribunal established under section 58H of the Defence Act 1903 is responsible for setting pay and pay-related allowances for ADF members. In 2014–15, a new ADF Workforce Remuneration Arrangement, together with simplified salary and allowance structures for members, produced better and simpler pay outcomes for ADF members.

The ADF Workplace Remuneration Arrangement 2014–17 is a key component of the ADF remuneration framework. The arrangement is part of the ADF remuneration initiative aimed at attracting and retaining military personnel. It forms a significant part of the Defence offer to the ADF.

The Workplace Remuneration Arrangement increases pay and pay-related allowances. Other conditions of service are determined by the Minister for Defence under section 58B of the Defence Act. The current arrangement expires on 1 November 2017. Table 8.10 details salary ranges for permanent ADF members as at 30 June 2015.

Table 8.10: Permanent ADF salary ranges as at 30 June 2015

Rank

Salary range

Minimum

Maximum

Officer of the permanent force (equivalent)

General (E)[1]

$535,100

$764,420

Lieutenant General (E)[1]

$358,400

$537,600

Major General (E)[2]

$222,006

$270,736

Brigadier (E)[2, 3]

$153,090

$247,578

Colonel (E)[2, 3, 4]

$137,710

$236,359

Lieutenant Colonel (E)[2, 4]

$118,431

$224,912

Major (E)[2, 4]

$82,962

$202,607

Captain (E)[2, 4]

$64,977

$192,306

Lieutenant (E)[5]

$54,015

$113,224

2nd Lieutenant (E)[5]

$50,466

$105,699

Other rank of the permanent force (equivalent)

Warrant Officer Class 1 (E)

$73,579

$113,246

Warrant Officer Class 2 (E)

$67,770

$104,933

Staff Sergeant (E)

$65,497

$101,230

Sergeant (E)

$58,561

$96,812

Corporal (E)

$50,605

$88,526

Lance Corporal (E)

$46,549

$82,282

Private Proficient (E)

$45,587

$81,321

Private (E)

$44,644

$80,381

Notes

  1. General (E) and some Lieutenant General (E) rates are set by the Remuneration Tribunal.
  2. Includes rates for Medical Officers.
  3. Includes rates for Chaplains.
  4. Excludes Medical Procedural Specialist.
  5. Includes transitional rates for other rank appointed as officer.

ADF Super and ADF Cover

Defence has established a new superannuation package for the military, called ADF Super. ADF Super will become the default superannuation fund for all new permanent ADF members and members of the Reserves on continuous full-time service from 1 July 2016. The new superannuation arrangements will provide more flexible and portable superannuation that recognises the unique nature of military service for Australia’s service men and women.

ADF Super have an employer contribution rate of 16.4 per cent. From 1 July 2016 ADF members will be able to transfer their accumulated ADF Super benefits to a fund of their choice at any time, including if they leave the ADF.

ADF Cover, the statutory death and invalidity scheme that will apply to ADF Super members and those who choose another fund, does not require any personal contributions and is consistent with the cover provided by the Military Superannuation and Benefits Scheme.

APS remuneration

The Defence Enterprise Collective Agreement sets out most of the terms and conditions of employment—including remuneration, performance management and working arrangements—for Defence’s non-SES APS employees. The legal framework that underpins the agreement includes the Fair Work Act 2009 and the Public Service Act 1999. The agreement is developed through extensive consultation with Defence employees and their representatives and is negotiated consistent with that legislation and broader government policy.

Work undertaken in 2014–15 on a new collective agreement for Defence’s APS employees will continue in 2015–16, with the aim of reaching a mutually agreeable package of remuneration and conditions.

Through the agreement, Defence provides its APS employees with an attractive employment package and, in return, employees and supervisors have a range of responsibilities (including mutual responsibilities) that must be fulfilled as part of their employment.

Table 8.11 reflects Defence APS salary arrangements as at 30 June 2015. The majority of Defence employees receive salaries within the standard salary range; however, some employees with specialist skills receive higher salaries that reflect individual arrangements or recognised technical skill sets. These are covered under the Defence Enterprise Collective Agreement.

Remuneration arrangements need to be flexible enough to allow Defence to develop, attract and retain employees with the necessary skills and knowledge. The Secretary and any employee covered by the Defence Enterprise Collective Agreement may agree to make an individual flexibility arrangement to vary the effect of some specified terms of the agreement.

Table 8.11: APS salary ranges at 30 June 2014

 

Broadband salary range

Classification

Minimum

Maximum

Individual arrangements[1]

SES pay arrangements

SES Band 3

$228,846

$272,659

$491,008

SES Band 2

$184,037

$222,173

$254,003[2]

SES Band 1

$151,665

$177,964

$195,760

Collective agreement[3]

Executive Level 2

$111,559

$133,905

$179,276[4]

Executive Level 1

$96,084

$108,382

$133,905[5]

APS Level 6

$76,023

$86,844

$89,463[6]

APS Level 5

$69,395

$74,331

$74,904[7]

APS Level 4

$63,236

$69,038

$69,038

APS Level 3

$55,825

$61,512

$61,512

APS Level 2

$49,009

$55,096

$55,663[8]

APS Level 1

$43,306

$48,613

$48,613

Notes

  1. Maximum salary paid under an individual remuneration arrangement shown.
  2. Includes rates for Medical Officer Class 6.
  3. Salary ranges provided under the Defence Enterprise Collective Agreement.
  4. Includes rates for EL2.1, EL2.2, Legal and Science specialist structures and Medical Officer Class 3 and 4.
  5. Includes rates for Public Affairs and Legal specialist structures and Medical Officer Class 1 and 2.
  6. Includes rates for Public Affairs Grade 2 retained pay point.
  7. Includes rates for Senior Technical Officer Grade 1 retained pay point.
  8. Includes rates for Technical Assistant Grade 2 retained pay point.

Senior Leadership Group remuneration

ADF: All ADF senior officers (excluding statutory office-holders) are remunerated under the ADF Workplace Remuneration Arrangement 2014–17. Other conditions of service are determined by the Minister for Defence under section 58B of the Defence Act.

Statutory officers: Statutory office-holders, including the Secretary and the Chief of the Defence Force, are remunerated under determinations of the Remuneration Tribunal, made under the Remuneration Tribunal Act 1973.

APS: SES employees’ conditions are set by a single determination made for them under section 24(1) of the Public Service Act and supplemented by individual common law agreements. As Defence operates in a values-based employment framework, mutual responsibilities on issues such as accountability, performance and productivity are set out in these instruments.

Performance pay

Performance-related pay is available to non-SES employees under the current Defence Enterprise Collective Agreement. Subject to performance, employees may be eligible to progress to a higher pay point within the salary band for their classification or, for those at the top of the range, be paid a 1 per cent lump-sum payment. The salary advancement is not considered performance pay; however, the lump-sum payment to employees at the top of the pay band is considered to be a form of performance pay.

An SES employee may be paid non-superannuable bonuses. A performance bonus may be paid as an incentive and reward for exceptional performance during the performance cycle. Payment of a performance bonus is dependent on the Secretary’s assessment of the SES employee’s performance. A retention bonus may be paid as an incentive to remain in an identified role.

Performance-based pay is not a feature of any existing ADF remuneration framework. Career development opportunities, including promotion, are the key recognitions of performance.

Productivity gains

The Australian Government requires improved remuneration and conditions for APS employees to be underpinned by improved productivity and performance. In accordance with the government Public Sector Workplace Bargaining Policy, Commonwealth agencies are required to ensure that they are able to demonstrate that proposed improvements to the terms and conditions of employment for agency employees are underpinned by quantifiable productivity initiatives.

Managing and developing APS staff

Defence continued to make progress in the ongoing development of its APS workforce in Defence. In 2014–15, Defence defined a comprehensive leadership development pathway for APS employees, with an approved corporate menu of leadership training, including courses sourced through the Australian Public Service Commission.

The suite of management and administration courses covering core skills was reviewed to best align with APS values, Pathway to Change: Evolving Defence Culture, diversity and inclusion, and managing change.

Three mandated corporate development programmes were reviewed, comprising the New Starters, First Time Manager and First Time Supervisor programmes. They continue to inform and assist employees at key career points. New courses were developed to address skill gaps for existing APS managers and supervisors, providing them with ongoing support and learning opportunities.

A range of new training was developed and introduced, including courses in online awareness for cyber security and implementation of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

Defence has developed a leading for reform programme, primarily for Executive Level staff in the Defence enabling groups. This programme aims to equip the cohort with the skills to successfully lead and deliver across a range of reform activities associated with the First Principles Review.

Defence continued to implement the work arising from the APS Job Families Project. This included identifying and documenting key job family–specific skills, knowledge and qualifications for more than 1,200 occupations in the Defence APS workforce. The results will inform the professional development of more than 15,500 non-SES APS employees.

In early 2015, Defence began a work value review programme to assess APS positions within Defence work units, in order to determine whether the allocated APS classification assigned to each role was correct. To date, this work has been applied to the Defence People Group and the Capability Development Group, and will continue as part of implementation of the First Principles Review.

Complaint handling and resolution

Defence personnel have the right to complain if they are aggrieved by matters related to their employment. ADF members (permanent and reserve) may apply for redress of grievance under the provisions of Part XV of the Defence Force Regulations 1952. APS members may seek a review of actions under the Public Service Act.

Reporting on sexual misconduct

In 2014–15, Defence’s Sexual Misconduct Prevention and Response Office (SeMPRO) continued to develop, deliver and refine a wide range of services and outcomes in support of the Defence population.

SeMPRO’s mandate encompasses a range of important work in relation to sexual misconduct prevention and response, including operating a 24/7 telephone response capability for anyone who seeks support; the development and evaluation of sexual ethics education and primary prevention programmes; and delivering face-to-face awareness briefings across Defence. SeMPRO also acts as a central point of data collection for incidents of reported sexual misconduct as well as providing expert practical and policy-based advice to assist personnel responsible for managing cases of sexual misconduct in Defence.

In 2014–15, SeMPRO assisted more than 310 callers to the 1800SeMPRO telephone service and case-managed 118 SeMPRO clients.

SeMPRO’s prevention and education programmes have been a focus this year. In 2014–15, SeMPRO delivered an overarching strategy for sexual ethics education in Defence, which encompasses a growing range of expert-endorsed, cutting-edge education and prevention interventions and programmes that are designed to reduce the incidence of sexual misconduct in Defence.

View the SeMPRO report.

Unacceptable behaviour

Defence personnel can make a complaint about any incident of unacceptable behaviour they have experienced or witnessed in the workplace. Defence policy requires any complaint of unacceptable behaviour to be reported and recorded on the Defence Complaints Management, Tracking and Reporting System (ComTrack). Guidance and support are available to ensure that complaints are managed and resolved appropriately.

All Defence personnel are required to undertake annual workplace behaviour training, which includes information about expectations of behaviour and guidance on dealing with complaints of unacceptable behaviour.

In 2014–15, 846 complaints of unacceptable behaviour were recorded in ComTrack (Figure 8.1). This is a slight increase on the previous year and reflects the ongoing encouragement of personnel to report any incident of unacceptable behaviour.

Complaints fall into the following six main categories:

  • abuse of power
  • discrimination
  • harassment
  • sexual harassment
  • workplace bullying
  • inappropriate workplace relationships and conflict of interest.

On average, between 10 and 15 per cent of unacceptable behaviour incidents are of a level of seriousness that results in a formal disciplinary or administrative outcome. The majority of complaints continue to be resolved informally. The number of complaints of alleged unacceptable behaviour represent complaints from less than 1 per cent of the Defence workforce.

Figure 8.1: Unacceptable behaviour complaints reported as received and finalised, 2010–11 to 2014–15

Work health and safety performance

Defence is committed to maintaining a safe, healthy and positive working environment for all workers to enable them to contribute to delivering Defence’s capability requirements.

Defence continued to implement the 2012–17 Defence Work Health and Safety (WHS) Strategy to drive continuous improvement of the work health and safety systems across the whole of Defence, including managing hazards and risks through working groups and committees that cover operational areas, Groups/Services (safety boards), and whole-of-defence management (Defence Work Health and Safety Committee).

The Defence WHS Management System is based on the premise that the business owner of any platform, fleet, process, system, place or workforce is responsible for the identification of hazards and control of risks associated with that thing. Responsibilities overlap and business owners are required to communicate, consult and coordinate to ensure that all hazards are identified and risks controlled. Business owners are located in all Groups and Services.

Sentinel

Defence implemented the first release of a whole-of-Defence WHS information management system (Sentinel) in August 2014. The introduction of Sentinel enabled a common technological platform for the entirety of Defence to manage and share WHS information and introduced a number of new facilities for Defence officers and workers.

The first release included an expanded detail replacement for WHS incident capture and reporting functionality, along with a facility to record and manage hazards. The introduction of Sentinel has improved the availability, timeliness and quality of WHS information for decision-makers.

The second release of Sentinel occurred in January 2015. This release included a range of higher-level governance and assurance functionality to aid in the overall management of WHS across Defence, including a new common risk management and recording methodology.

The introduction of Sentinel supports a key objective from the 2012–17 Defence Work Health and Safety Strategic Plan. Sentinel will provide decision-makers at all levels with access to comprehensive quality WHS information so they can eliminate, or manage, hazards across the Defence lifecycle and upon disposal.

Hazardous chemicals enforceable undertaking

Defence entered into a voluntary cooperative compliance programme with Comcare following the lifting of the hazardous chemicals enforceable undertaking in November 2013.

The cooperative compliance programme maintained regulator oversight as Defence introduced an ongoing Defence hazardous chemicals reduction programme. The cooperative compliance programme concluded in February 2015. The Defence hazardous chemicals reduction programme that has been implemented aims to eliminate or substitute hazardous chemical use in Defence so far as is reasonably practicable.

Policy development

A significant number of WHS policies were finalised in 2014–15 and published for use across Defence:

  • miscellaneous workplace safety hazards policy and suite of procedures
  • heat injury policy
  • workplace stress and psychological injury policy
  • hazardous chemicals management policy and several related procedures
  • electrical safety policy and suite of procedures
  • first aid policy and suite of procedures
  • fatigue management policy and suite of procedures
  • management of major hazard facilities policy
  • emergency preparedness and management policy
  • management of safety risks policy and several related procedures.

A new manual of corporate WHS policy was developed and is scheduled for release in the second half of 2015.

Comcare interventions and investigations

Comcare undertakes interventions or inspections based on known high-risk areas. In order to assist Comcare to develop a workable arrangement for its new approach, Defence and Comcare have agreed on a protocol for the management of interventions. The number of proactive interventions is determined by the regulator’s strategic focus and available resources.

During 2014–15, the number of Comcare interventions (185) decreased by 20 per cent from the 2013–14 figure (230) (228 in 2012–13).

In addition to partnering with Comcare on interventions and inspections, Defence actively investigates safety incidents. Twelve investigations were conducted in 2014–15. Investigations included reviewing causes of workplace stressors, noise protection and correct use of personal protection equipment. These investigations have led to the development or refinement of associated hazard reduction programmes and a heightened focus on using proper personal protection equipment across Defence.

The number of notifiable incidents continued to decline in 2014–15 (Table 8.12) and Comcare did not issue Defence with any notices in 2014–15 (Table 8.13).

The annual Defence survey checks the cultural aspects of safety and the results for 2014–15 are consistent with those from previous financial years (Table 8.14).

Table 8.12: Work health and safety—statistics and notifiable incidents, 2012–13 to 2014–15

Total incident reports[1]

Comcare—notifiable deaths[2]

Comcare—serious injury or illness

Comcare—dangerous incidents

Total Comcare notifiable incidents

2012–13

20,068

15

982

1,493

2,490

2013–14

16,802

5

559

745

1,312

2014–15

13,687

13

592

314

919

Notes

Defence completes a data quality process each year. For example, the process removes duplicated reports and ensures that reports are recorded in the correct financial year.

  1. Events are recorded based on the date of the event. Delays in the reporting of events affect these statistics. A single event may involve multiple people.
  2. Comcare notifiable deaths are all deaths, excluding those that were known to be combat related.
Table 8.13: Work health and safety—Comcare notices, 2012–13 to 2014–15

Reports

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

Improvement notices[1]

1

1

Prohibition notices[2]

3

Do not disturb notices[3]

1

Enforceable undertaking[4]

Written request[5]

Notes

  1. Improvement notices—based on incidents and occurrences that contravene the WHS legislation.
  2. Prohibition notices—issued to remove an immediate threat to the health or safety of workers.
  3. Do not disturb notices—issued for a specific period of time to remove a threat to the health or safety of personnel.
  4. Enforceable undertakings—Comcare may accept a written undertaking to fulfil an obligation under the WHS legislation.
  5. Written request—issued where the employer is to provide particulars of action proposed to be taken as a result of a Comcare report and/or any improvement of prohibition notice.
Table 8.14: Safety awareness surveys, 2012–13 to 2014–15

Attitude survey question

ADF

APS

2012–13 Agree

2013–14 Agree

2014–15 Agree

2012–13 Agree

2013–14 Agree

2014–15 Agree

Health and safety is treated as an important issue in my workplace.

90%

91%

92%

87%

87%

86%

I know how/where to obtain safety information relevant to my workplace.

92%

92%

92%

87%

87%

89%

When I report an accident/injury/incident/hazard,
I believe that appropriate action will be taken.

84%

85%

85%

82%

83%

82%

Actual staffing

This section provides workforce information as at 30 June 2015 and outlines changes in the workforce that occurred during 2014–15. It includes numbers of people, employment categories, locations and gender information. This information is based on headcount.

At 30 June 2015, Defence had 77,289 permanent employees, comprising 57,404 permanent ADF members and 19,885 ongoing APS employees. An additional 82 APS employees were employed on a non-ongoing basis.

During 2014–15, the permanent ADF strength increased by 369 to 57,404. The growth in the permanent workforce is expected to continue over the next few years until the ADF reaches its average funded strength guidance. The Reserve strength decreased by 798 to 23,157 (including those members on continuous full-time service and Active Reserve). The total ADF workforce was 80,561, and included 18,869 Navy permanent and Reserve members, 42,778 Army permanent and Reserve members and 18,914 Air Force permanent and Reserve members. At 30 June 2015, 1,235 Reservists were also Defence APS employees.

At 30 June 2015, there were 4,536 APS employees in the DMO and 15,431 in the remainder of Defence. This number includes all APS employees recorded as paid, unpaid, full-time, part-time, ongoing and non-ongoing.

Table 8.15: Defence workforce headcount, 30 June 2014 and 30 June 2015

 

Navy

Army

Air Force

ADF

APS[1]

30 June 2014[2]

Permanent ADF[3]

13,758

29,047

14,230

57,035

Department of Defence

15,885

DMO

5,306

Total at 30 June 2014

13,758

29,047

14,230

57,035

21,191

30 June 2015

Separations[3]

 

 

 

 

 

Permanent ADF

1,099

3,302

807

5,208

Department of Defence

1,298

DMO

378

Subtotal

1,099

3,302

807

5,208

1,676

Net transfers[4]

Department of Defence

483

DMO

–483

Subtotal

Additions

Permanent ADF[3]

1,290

3,448

839

5,577

Department of Defence

361

DMO

91

Subtotal

1,290

3,448

839

5,577

452

Employee numbers

Permanent ADF[3]

13,949

29,193

14,262

57,404

Department of Defence

15,431

DMO

4,536

Total at 30 June 2015

13,949

29,193

14,262

57,404

19,967

Change

191

146

32

369

-1,224

Notes

Figures in this table show employee numbers (substantive headcount).

  1. Includes paid and unpaid employees, which covers full-time, part-time, ongoing and non-ongoing employees.
  2. Some 30 June 2014 strength figures have been adjusted from what was reported in the Defence Annual Report 2013–14 to account for retrospective transactions.
  3. Figures do not include Reserves or those undertaking continuous full-time service.
  4. ‘Net transfers’ represents the net effect of transfer of APS employees between Defence and DMO. Some of these transfers are the result of movements under the shared services programme.
Table 8.16: Defence workforce by employment location, 30 June 2015

 

NSW

Vic.[1]

Qld

SA

WA

Tas.

NT

ACT[2]

O/S[3]

Total

Permanent forces[4]

Navy

6,894

1,580

834

103

2,230

15

598

1,538

157

13,949

Army

5,452

3,218

12,069

1,386

864

68

3,124

2,746

266

29,193

Air Force

4,716

976

2,974

2,008

357

7

962

1,979

283

14,262

Subtotal

17,062

5,774

15,877

3,497

3,451

90

4,684

6,263

706

57,404

Reserve forces[5]

Navy

1,291

543

732

226

811

133

131

1,049

4

4,920

Army

3,482

2,446

3,179

1,117

1,500

451

518

889

3

13,585

Air Force

1,171

378

1,255

426

291

55

124

951

1

4,652

Subtotal

5,944

3,367

5,166

1,769

2,602

639

773

2,889

8

23,157

Total ADF

23,006

9,141

21,043

5,266

6,053

729

5,457

9,152

714

80,561

APS[6]

APS (Defence)

2,041

2,564

1,108

1,951

355

81

268

6,991

72

15,431

APS (DMO)

1,040

1,356

284

255

182

21

1,393

5

4,536

Total APS

3,081

3,920

1,392

2,206

537

81

289

8,384

77

19,967

Notes

Figures in this table show employee numbers (substantive headcount).

  1. Victorian figures include employees located in Albury, NSW.
  2. ACT figures include employees located in Jervis Bay (Commonwealth), Queanbeyan (NSW) and Bungendore (NSW).
  3. Employees posted overseas for reasons including long-term duty, training, exchange and liaison.
  4. Includes paid and unpaid employees.
  5. Includes Reserves on continuous full-time service.
  6. Includes paid and unpaid employees, which covers full-time, part-time, ongoing and non-ongoing employees. The figures for APS include 1,235 APS employees who are also counted as Reserve members.
Table 8.17: Star-ranked officers, 30 June 2015

 

 

Total star rank[1, 2]

2014–15 promotions[3]

2014–15 separations[4, 5]

Men

Women

Total

Men

Women

Total

Men

Women

Total

Four star

Navy

Army

1

1

Air Force

1

1

1

1

Three star

Navy

3

3

1

1

Army

2

2

1

1

2

2

Air Force

1

1

Two star

Navy

13

1

14

2

2

4

4

Army

14

1

15

3

3

4

4

Air Force

11

11

3

3

2

2

One star

Navy[6]

35

4

39

3

3

6

5

5

Army[6]

49

6

55

7

1

8

8

1

9

Air Force[6]

35

3

38

8

8

5

1

6

Total

164

15

179

28

4

32

32

2

34

Notes

  1. Officers on acting or higher duties are not included.
  2. Figures only include those Reserve star ranked officers rendering continuous full-time service.
  3. Promotions include those officers promoted between levels and those officers promoted temporarily.
  4. Separations include only permanent officers who have separated from Defence or transferred to Reserves.
  5. Separations also include those officers promoted temporarily when they revert to their substantive rank.
  6. Figures include three Chaplains (one from each Service).
Table 8.18: APS Senior Executive Service employees, 30 June 2015

 

 

Total SES[1]

2014–15 engagements[2, 3]

2014–15 separations[2, 4]

Men

Women

Total

Men

Women

Total

Men

Women

Total

Senior Executive

Secretary

1

1

Band 3

11

2

13

1

1

Band 2[5]

20

5

25

2

2

5

1

6

Band 1

57

24

81

1

1

2

6

3

9

Chief of Division

Grade 3

2

2

Grade 2

8

3

11

Senior Executive

Relief staff[6]

20

14

34

Total

117

48

165

3

1

4

13

5

18

Notes

  1. Figures in this table show actual employee numbers at their substantive level, but not staff on longer-term unpaid leave.
  2. Gains and losses do not reflect movement of officers between levels in each of the Senior Executive and Chief of Division streams.
  3. Engagement figures include new engagements and transfers from other agencies only.
  4. Separation figures include resignations, retirements, redundancies, and promotions and transfers to other departments.
  5. Senior Executive Service Band 2 includes Medical Officer Grade 6.
  6. Relief staff indicates non-SES officers who are temporarily acting in SES/Chief of Division positions while the incumbents are taking leave, acting in higher positions or on overseas duty.

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Table 8.19: APS personnel by gender, 30 June 2014 and 30 June 2015

 

 

30 June 2014[1]

30 June 2015

Full-time

Part-time[2]

Total

Full-time

Part-time[2]

Total

Ongoing employees

Men

12,309

216

12,525

11,569

223

11,792

Women

7,453

1,120

8,573

6,929

1,164

8,093

Total ongoing

19,762

1,336

21,098

18,498

1,387

19,885

Non-ongoing employees

Men

48

9

57

41

18

59

Women

34

2

36

20

3

23

Total non-ongoing

82

11

93

61

21

82

Men

12,357

225

12,582

11,610

241

11,851

Women

7,487

1,122

8,609

6,949

1,167

8,116

Total APS

19,844

1,347

21,191

18,559

1,408

19,967

Notes

Figures in this table show employee numbers (substantive headcount). Figures include paid and unpaid employees.

  1. Some 30 June 2014 figures have been adjusted from what was reported in the Defence Annual Report 2013–14 to account for retrospective transactions.
  2. Part-time employees are those with weekly hours less than the standard hours. The category does not relate to employees in part-time positions.
Table 8.20: ADF permanent and Reserve forces and APS by gender, 30 June 2014 and 30 June 2015

 

 

30 June 2014[1]

30 June 2015

Men

%

Women

%

Men

%

Women

%

Navy permanent

Trained force

Officers

2,031

14.8%

495

3.6%

2,032

14.6%

489

3.5%

Other ranks

7,071

51.4%

1,562

11.4%

7,084

50.8%

1,607

11.5%

Training force

Officers

608

4.4%

157

1.1%

605

4.3%

158

1.1%

Other ranks

1,486

10.8%

348

2.5%

1,600

11.5%

374

2.7%

Total Navy

11,196

81.4%

2,562

18.6%

11,321

81.2%

2,628

18.8%

Army permanent

Trained force

Officers

4,546

15.7%

809

2.8%

4,487

15.4%

816

2.8%

Other ranks

17,458

60.1%

2,023

7.0%

17,863

61.2%

2,150

7.4%

Training force

Officers

805

2.8%

190

0.7%

827

2.8%

210

0.7%

Other ranks

2,816

9.7%

400

1.4%

2,495

8.5%

345

1.2%

Total Army

25,625

88.2%

3,422

11.8%

25,672

87.9%

3,521

12.1%

Air Force permanent

Trained force

Officers

3,354

23.6%

846

5.9%

3,368

23.6%

873

6.1%

Other ranks

7,295

51.3%

1,438

10.1%

7,229

50.7%

1,464

10.3%

Training force

Officers

529

3.7%

156

1.1%

535

3.8%

190

1.3%

Other ranks

470

3.3%

142

1.0%

473

3.3%

130

0.9%

Total Air Force

11,648

81.9%

2,582

18.1%

11,605

81.4%

2,657

18.6%

ADF permanent

Trained force

Officers

9,931

17.4%

2,150

3.8%

9,887

17.2%

2,178

3.8%

Other ranks

31,824

55.8%

5,023

8.8%

32,176

56.1%

5,221

9.1%

Training force

Officers

1,942

3.4%

503

0.9%

1,967

3.4%

558

1.0%

Other ranks

4,772

8.4%

890

1.6%

4,568

8.0%

849

1.5%

Total ADF permanent

48,469

85.0%

8,566

15.0%

48,598

84.7%

8,806

15.3%

Reserves[2]

Navy

4,005

16.7%

1,035

4.3%

3,908

16.9%

1,012

4.4%

Army

12,625

52.7%

1,925

8.0%

11,752

50.7%

1,833

7.9%

Air Force

3,476

14.5%

889

3.7%

3,709

16.0%

943

4.1%

Total Reserves

20,106

83.9%

3,849

16.1%

19,369

83.6%

3,788

16.4%

APS[3]

APS (Defence)

9,009

42.5%

6,876

32.4%

8,669

43.4%

6,762

33.9%

APS (DMO)

3,573

16.9%

1,733

8.2%

3,182

15.9%

1,354

6.8%

Total APS

12,582

59.4%

8,609

40.6%

11,851

59.4%

8,116

40.6%

Notes

Figures in this table show employee numbers (substantive headcount). Percentages are calculated against the individual Service totals. Percentages may not sum due to rounding.

  1. Some 30 June 2014 figures have been adjusted from what was reported in the Defence Annual Report 2013–14 to account for retrospective transactions.
  2. Reserves include all active members (training, deployed and other part-time military work commitments) and those on continuous full-time service.
  3. Figures include paid, unpaid, full-time, part-time, ongoing and non-ongoing employees. The 30 June 2015 figures for APS include 1,235 APS employees who are also counted as Reserve members.

Diversity in Defence

The Defence Diversity and Inclusion Strategy 2012–2017 articulates the five strategic goals that underpin successful diversity and inclusion in Defence. The strategy also identifies immediate diversity priorities for Defence. These priorities align with each stage of the employment lifecycle of Defence people—attract, recruit, develop, retain and transition. They also reflect those groups in Defence requiring priority attention, including:

  • women
  • Indigenous Australians
  • people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds
  • people with disability
  • lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people.

Defence’s professionalism and capability are underpinned by its ability to remain linked to the broadest cross-section of Australian society. While the diversity profile of the Defence workforce is improving, it does not reflect that of the Australian community. Defence needs to access the available talent in Australia to harness the capability benefit and improved decision-making that a diverse workforce generates.

Defence continues to implement programmes and initiatives that harness the diverse knowledge, skills and attributes of its people. Through diversity, Defence gains the varied perspectives needed to deal with complex problems and develop innovative solutions.

Defence is ensuring that its culture gives confidence to the Australian people that the organisation is just, inclusive and fair-minded.

Women in Defence

Defence has furthered its efforts to implement changes in the workplace to ensure greater representation of women, specifically in leadership positions. The Secretary and Chief of the Defence Force Gender Equality Advisory Board, composed of public and private sector members, has continued to advise Defence on these issues. The board’s main areas of focus in 2014–15 were increasing accountability for gender inclusion and flexible work practices.

Women in the APS

Over the previous three years, all recommendations from the 2011 Review of employment pathways for APS women in Defence have been implemented. The representation of women in the Defence APS has not significantly changed, and is well below that of the wider APS. In 2014–15 further initiatives addressed the structural and cultural barriers preventing women from achieving their full potential and full participation. These initiatives included:

  • a Leadership Inclusion Programme, delivered to all SES officers, to raise understanding of the impact of bias, build individual and collective commitment to creating an inclusive workplace, and develop the capabilities required to be an effective and inclusive leader
  • targeted marketing of women for Defence graduate programmes and more ambitious gender targets for the recruitment of APS graduates
  • mentoring and coaching programmes, including tools and materials available to the Defence workforce through the intranet
  • increased representation of women in Executive Level 1 and Executive Level 2 talent programmes
  • stronger senior leadership support for flexible work arrangements, including raising the level of approval required for agreement of part-time arrangements to encourage greater access to these arrangements
  • promotion of the Male Champions of Change initiative across Defence senior women’s mentoring and networking groups
  • the development of a gender inclusion kit to use in a workshop-based approach aimed at challenging gender inclusion myths and equipping employees to advance gender equality
  • cultural awareness activities in specific areas in Defence to raise understanding of the impact of unconscious bias.

Women in the ADF

The Review into the treatment of women in the Australian Defence Force—Phase 2 report, undertaken by Sex Discrimination Commissioner Elizabeth Broderick, established a strong capability imperative to improve the treatment of women and enhance their career opportunities in the ADF. Defence remains committed to a range of strategies and targets required to achieve the recommendations of this review.

The ‘Women in the ADF’ report is published as an online supplement to the Defence Annual Report for the third time this year. The report addresses elements of Broderick Phase 2 recommendation 3, including women’s participation, women’s experience and access to flexible work. It is also the mechanism for the Services to report against achievements for recommendation 6—promotional gateways; recommendation 9—recruitment targets; and recommendation 13—flexible work arrangements targets.

The report presents a range of workforce and attitudinal data and compares the current year’s data with that of the previous year to gain an indication of the progress Defence has achieved. Data is supplemented by simple commentary and graphics to facilitate an understanding of the current status of these metrics and their movement.

The ‘Women in the ADF’ report shows that, since the commencement of Pathway to Change: Evolving Defence Culture and the implementation of the Broderick Phase 2 recommendations, the ADF has put considerable effort into growing and advancing the female ADF workforce. In 2014–15 the participation rate of women in the ADF reached 15.3 per cent, an increase from 14.3 per cent in June 2013. The report also highlights areas that require more comprehensive analysis, allowing Defence to prioritise further research on gender diversity.

Defence will continue to produce a ‘Women in the ADF’ report each year. This will enable an accurate measurement of progress on women’s employment and experience, identify areas of concern and highlight successful initiatives across the three Services.

View the Women in the ADF report.

Removal of gender restrictions from ADF combat role employment categories

Defence is well into the implementation of the removal of gender restrictions from ADF combat role employment categories. Defence will begin direct recruitment into all combat role employment categories by 2016.

A phased implementation plan was endorsed by the Government in June 2012, with progress reflected in Table 8.21. Key milestones fully achieved in 2011–12, 2012–13 and 2013–14 are reported in the Defence annual reports for those years. The final reporting on this initiative will be made following completion of the implementation plan in 2015–16. Pathway to Change: Evolving Defence Culture, as an enabling initiative, will continue to be reported separately.

Table 8.21: Progress on removal of gender restrictions in the ADF since June 2012

Key milestone

Status

Click to view the User Guide page

Key

Met

• • •

Substantially met

• •

Partially met

• •

Not met

• • •

Click to view the full user guide

Corporate

Pathway to Change: Evolving Defence Culture

Status Substantially Met • •

Pathway to Change continues to make considerable progress.

Navy

New Generation Navy (cultural change programme)

Status Substantially Met • •

Ongoing activity. This milestone is due for completion by December 2015.

Support mechanisms developed

Status Substantially Met • •

Ongoing activity. This milestone is due for completion by December 2015.

Army

Implementing cultural change programmes

Status Substantially Met • •

Ongoing activity. The milestone is due for completion by December 2015.

Amend policy/procedures and training documents

Status Substantially Met • •

Ongoing activity. This milestone is due for completion by December 2015.

Air Force

Cultural reform initiatives

Status Substantially Met • •

Ongoing activity. Specific activities related to inclusion and the removal of gender restrictions are scheduled to be completed by December 2015. Ongoing activities will be rolled into the broader Air Force cultural reform programme.

Indigenous participation and engagement

Defence continues to make progress against the objectives outlined in the Defence Indigenous Employment Strategy 2012–2017. The organisation provides a range of programmes for Indigenous Australians with the aim of improving individuals’ access to employment opportunities and working with remote communities on infrastructure and environmental conditions.

In 2014–15, Indigenous participation in the ADF permanent force increased from 1.3 per cent to 1.4 per cent, while the Defence APS participation rate increased from 1.0 per cent to 1.2 per cent. Table 8.22 gives further details.

Several initiatives from the Defence Indigenous Employment Strategy have advanced, including the greater use of ‘affirmative measures’ positions across the APS workforce; the development of the Defence Reconciliation Action Plan 2015–17; the Defence Indigenous University Support Programme; and the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Certificate IV in Indigenous Leadership course. The Certificate IV course has been introduced to support retention and development of Indigenous personnel. The course aims to provide professional development opportunities for Indigenous personnel by building skills for future career progression.

Through the Australian Public Service Commission’s Indigenous Pathways programme, Defence has increased its 2014–15 intakes for the Defence APS traineeship and cadetship programmes. Defence is also participating in the Department of Human Services’ Indigenous Apprenticeship (traineeship) programme.

The number of entry-level programme participants for the Defence APS grew from eight in 2013 to 88 in 2015, and is projected to increase to 100 in 2016. Defence is also increasing its APS Indigenous representation through advertising up to 135 affirmative measures positions, which will be located across Australia, at the APS 2 to EL 2 level. These roles are important to Defence outcomes and to lifting its cultural capability.

Defence continued to conduct a range of programmes to support the recruitment of Indigenous Australians to the ADF. The most notable are the four Indigenous pre-recruitment courses conducted each year and the three Defence Indigenous development programmes. These courses aim to develop participants’ knowledge, confidence and individual skills to prepare them for a career in the ADF or Defence APS. Key components include culture and values; fitness; military training; preparation for the recruiting process; and language, literacy and numeracy skills.

Defence also continues to engage in a number of events across the country during NAIDOC Week and National Reconciliation Week to celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture.

Table 8.22: Defence Indigenous employees as at 1 July 2014 and 1 July 2015

1 July 2014

Total %

1 July 2015

Total %

ADF

Permanent

750

1.3%

832

1.4%

Active Reserve

462

1.9%

440

1.9%

Navy

Permanent

229

1.7%

264

1.9%

Active Reserve

34

0.7%

34

0.7%

Army

Permanent

387

1.3%

421

1.4%

Active Reserve

397

2.7%

370

2.7%

Air Force

Permanent

134

0.9%

147

1.0%

Active Reserve

31

0.7%

36

0.8%

APS

Ongoing

210

1.0%

237

1.2%

Non-ongoing

1

1.1%

1

1.2%

Notes

Active Reserve figures include continuous full-time service.

Data for this table is reliant on self-identification on the Defence HR system. Therefore, the data is likely to under-report actual rates.

Last year’s numbers will not match those provided in the report from the same month last year. This is because these numbers are updated to include changes in self-identification that have been made within the last 12 months.

People from a culturally and linguistically diverse background

In 2014–15, Defence gave greater focus to culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities. Defence is seeking to reflect the community it serves and is currently identifying what Defence’s priority capability areas are for CALD engagement; this includes developing initiatives and programmes for both ADF members and APS employees that are aimed at all aspects of the employee lifecycle. 

In 2014–15, Defence developed a CALD Action Plan, which has an initial focus on ADF recruitment.

Defence has begun work on attracting individuals from CALD backgrounds into specific ADF employment categories, such as health, engineering and IT. Defence Force Recruiting is also developing a specific media plan to further engage with CALD communities.

Defence’s CALD initiatives complement existing Defence efforts to build a diverse and inclusive workforce under Pathway to Change: Evolving Defence Culture and the Defence Diversity and Inclusion Strategy 2012–2017.

Defence is committed to recognising the importance of people’s religious faiths. A significant step in creating an inclusive environment has been the appointment of a Muslim representative to the Defence Religious Advisory Committee to the Services. This will ensure that those ADF members of Islamic faith have appropriate representation and are further supported in their military careers.

People with disability

Defence continues to support people with disability, and increase Defence’s attractiveness as an employer through a range of programmes and initiatives. These include:

  • the Defence Intellectual Disability Employment Initiative, which offers ongoing APS employment opportunities to people with intellectual disability
  • the Defence Employee Network, which is open to people with disability, their supervisors, and employees with an interest in disability
  • the Reasonable Adjustment Passport, which has been introduced to support people with disability to negotiate the workplace adjustments they require to eliminate barriers to the workplace
  • the Defence Administrative Assistance Programme, currently located in Canberra and at Gallipoli Barracks at Enoggera, is being expanded to six other Defence locations to provide employment opportunities for people with disability through community partnerships
  • the Defence Paralympian Programme, which offers non-ongoing employment for 12 months to Paralympians
  • the APS RecruitAbility Scheme, which continues to be applied to all advertised APS positions in Defence
  • the Defence Disability Champion Programme, which has three senior Defence leaders as Disability Champions who provide support, advice and advocacy on issues relating to disability
  • the celebration of the International Day of People with Disability on 3 December each year.

Disability reporting mechanisms

Since 1994, Commonwealth departments and agencies have reported on their performance as policy adviser, purchaser, employer, regulator and provider under the Commonwealth Disability Strategy. In 2007–08, reporting on the employer role was transferred to the Australian Public Service Commission’s State of the Service Report and the APS Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available on the Australian Public Service Commission’s website. Since 2010–11, departments and agencies have no longer been required to report on these functions.

The Commonwealth Disability Strategy has been overtaken by the National Disability Strategy 2010–2020, which sets out a 10-year national policy framework to improve the lives of people with disability, promote participation and create a more inclusive society. A high-level two-yearly report will track progress against each of the six outcome areas of the strategy and present a picture of how people with disability are faring. The first of these reports was published in 2014 on the Department of Social Services website.

A key aspect of Defence’s disability support is to grow its people’s confidence to report any disabilities. Like many other agencies, Defence has seen a slow increase in the number of people identifying as having a disability. Comprehensive and accurate disability information will assist Defence to understand the nature of the workforce, provide more targeted disability training, advice and support and focus on improving workforce culture and social inclusion.

Table 8.23 gives details on participation by people with disability in the Defence workforce.

Table 8.23: Defence employees with disability as at 1 July 2014 and 1 July 2015

1 July 2014

Total %

1 July 2015

Total %

ADF

Permanent

255

0.4%

262

0.5%

Active Reserve

114

0.5%

117

0.5%

Navy

Permanent

63

0.5%

65

0.5%

Active Reserve

31

0.6%

32

0.7%

Army

Permanent

144

0.5%

146

0.5%

Active Reserve

69

0.5%

67

0.5%

Air Force

Permanent

48

0.3%

51

0.4%

Active Reserve

14

0.3%

18

0.4%

APS

Ongoing

657

3.1%

658

3.3%

Non-ongoing

Notes

Active Reserve figures include continuous full-time service.

Data for this table is reliant on self-identification on the Defence HR system. Therefore, the data is likely to under-report actual rates.

Last year’s numbers will not match those provided in the report from the same month last year. This is because these numbers are updated to include changes in self-identification that have been made within the last 12 months.

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people

Defence has a number of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) initiatives in place that enhance inclusiveness and provide additional support and networks for LGBTI people. Defence continues to engage with other government bodies and military organisations, as well as supporting research in the LGBTI space.

Each year, Pride in Diversity Australia issues the Australian Workplace Equality Index (AWEI), a benchmarking initiative that assesses organisations’ commitment to LGBTI workplace practices. Participation in this index provides Defence with comprehensive feedback on its LGBTI inclusiveness. At the 2015 AWEI awards, Defence was jointly recognised, with another public sector agency, as the top public sector employer for LGBTI people. Defence was also identified as a Silver status employer for an inclusive workplace.