skip to navigation skip to content skip to footer

Annual Report 2013-14

Volume 1, Part 2 : Performance

Program 1.3: Army Capabilities


The Chief of Army, Lieutenant General David Morrison, AO, is responsible and accountable to the CDF for the command of the Army and the management of designated joint functions. He oversees corporate policy formation within the Army and is jointly responsible and accountable to the CDF and the Secretary for the effective and efficient management of his Service. He is also Defence’s principal army adviser on strategic matters.


The Army contributes to the achievement of the Government’s defence objectives through the provision of capabilities for land, amphibious and special operations. The Army also provides capability to enhance the national domestic security response to terrorist, chemical, biological, radiological or explosive incidents among other support for national security tasks during peacetime.

Highlights during 2013–14 included the following:

  • The Australian Light Armoured Vehicle Multi Spectral Surveillance Suite reached initial operational capability, an important early milestone in the delivery of a complete capability.
  • A number of projects achieved their final operational capability, including additional CH-47D helicopters, artillery replacement, water purification and desalination, and the Counter Rocket Artillery Mortar/Missile.
  • Several projects achieved significant equipment deliveries, including the digitisation of protected mobility vehicles, G-wagons and dismounted soldiers through the delivery of enhanced radios and battle management systems, and the delivery of 1,161 light trucks and 766 trailers.
  • In response to operationally urgent requests from deployed forces to support the Middle East Area of Operation, the Army, in conjunction with the Defence Materiel Organisation, deployed weapon clamps and additional external composite armour for protected mobility vehicles, up-armoured sports utility vehicles, protected mobility ambulances and Bushmaster vehicles.
  • The Army trialled an Amphibious Pre-deployment Training Program similar to the proven United States Marine Corps program. The program was validated during Exercise Talisman Sabre 2013.
  • The Army continued to develop and refine its support to wounded, injured and ill personnel, and worked closely with Joint Health Command and other stakeholders, particularly in the area of mental health, to ensure that a continuum of care and support was provided to its personnel. The Army is developing regional and national-level industry partnerships to create employment and career opportunities for wounded, injured and ill personnel who separate from the Army and to address their transition in a comprehensive whole-of-life context.
  • The plan to increase capability through diversity continued to raise the representation of women in the Australian Regular Army, from 11 per cent to just under 12 per cent of the permanent force at June 2014. The Army Indigenous Strategy has expanded in scope and seeks to increase Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander representation to 2.7 per cent, in line with Australian Government targets.
  • The Army continued to implement Pathway to Change through a number of programs that are focused on diversity, inclusivity and respect. These programs directly enhance capability and ensure that the organisation excels in preparing for and conducting operations in support of Australia and our national interests, while reflecting modern community standards and attitudes.

Table 3.9: Program 1.3 deliverables

Deliverable

Status

Prepare, sustain and lead assigned forces to deliver capability to meet government requirements

Met

Conduct force generation and force preparation and maintain preparedness of capability as directed by the CDF

Met

Continue to contribute to domestic security operations

Met

In consultation with Capability Development Group and the DMO, continue to plan, develop and monitor the delivery of, and transition to, new capability

Met

Provide timely, accurate and considered advice on Army capabilities to the Government, the CDF and the Secretary

Met

Develop programs to increase diversity within Army’s workforce

Met

Continue to improve programs that provide support for Army’s seriously wounded and ill personnel

Substantially met

Improvements were made in the rehabilitation of members remaining in the ADF through the development of Soldier Recovery Centres and the Intensive Recovery Team concept, which is to be expanded further. Issues involving the processes in the Medical Employment Categorisation system and the relationships between multiple Defence, other government and non-government agencies are being addressed through a project being run by the
Army Improvement Team.

Undertake joint collective training to ensure force elements are prepared for deployment

Met

Deliver force generation; namely, a training continuum that unifies individual and collective training to ensure Defence elements are prepared for joint force-in-being contributions, including joint enabling activities supporting other Services/Groups

Met

Implement reform through the Adaptive Army framework, Army Continuous Modernisation Plan and the Army Plan while continuing preparation of force elements for operational commitments and contingencies (this includes the Plan Beersheba initiatives, including the forming of multi-role combat brigades, an amphibious capability and reform of the Army Reserve)

Substantially met

These are multi-year programs and continue to be monitored.

Deliver Group-specific reform and savings without compromising agreed levels of Army capability, including the revamping of Army’s governance, risk, and budgeting and performance achievement management

Met

Table 3.10: Program 1.3 deliverables (rate of effort—flying hours)

Deliverable

Status

6 CH-47D Chinook

1,850 hrs

Met

34 S-70A-9 Black Hawk

6,500 hrs

Substantially met

6,398.5 flying hours. Contingency of 300 hours, approved in November 2013,
was not all used due to better than expected performance of MRH-90 Taipan.

41 B-206 Kiowa

6,400 hrs

Substantially met

5,722.3 flying hours. The underfly was due largely to lower than expected pilot recruitment and higher than normal failure rates earlier in the pilot training continuum.

22 Armed Reconnaissance Helicopter Tiger

3,360 hrs

Substantially met

3,019.3 flying hours. Tiger rate of effort improved in 2013–14, but significant further work is required by Airbus Helicopters to improve spare parts turn-around times and meet the increase in rate of effort necessary to support capability requirements.

46 multi-role helicopter (MRH-90)

4,000 hrs

Substantially met

3,641.3 flying hours. MRH-90 Taipan underfly was due to delayed service release of an aircraft configuration update and a reduced number of available aircraft. However, Taipan rate of effort continues to show steady improvement.

Table 3.11: Program 1.3 key performance indicators

Key performance indicator

Status

Achieve levels of preparedness as directed by the CDF

Met

Meet the Government’s operational requirements

Met

Generate and sustain forces for each current operation

Met

Achieve a level of training that maintains core skills, professional standards and baseline preparedness

Met

Provide timely, accurate and considered advice on Army capabilities to the Government,
CDF and the Secretary

Met