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DEC Notices

Guidance on Australian Export Controls and Life Sciences is now available

Guidance has been developed to assist researchers working in the Life Sciences to improve their understanding how Australia's export control laws apply to them

Australian Export Controls and Life Sciences guide.

Guidance on Australian Export Controls and ICT is now available

Guidance has been developed to assist ICT industry, software developers, academics and researchers to improve their understanding how Australia's export control laws apply to the export, supply, publication or brokering of proliferation-sensitive information and communication software and technology.

Australian Export Controls and ICT guide.

DEC now accepts DSP-83 - Non Transfer and Use Certificates in an electronic format

Defence Export Controls (DEC) signs DSP-83 Non Transfer and Use Certificates on behalf of the Commonwealth of Australia. The DSP-83 certificate provides a non-transfer and end-use assurance for defence goods and technology exported from the U.S. to Australia.

With immediate effect, DEC will accept scanned PDF copies of DSP-83 forms, with the relevant parts completed. These forms can be submitted electronically to DEC at DECO.Applications@defence.gov.au. DEC will sign the form, and return a scanned copy to you via email, generally within 1 - 2 business days.

DEC has previously only accepted original DSP-83 forms in hardcopy based on U.S. Government requirements, with certificates posted or hand delivered to DEC before they could be finalised and returned to the U.S..The U.S. Government is now accepting scanned copies of fully executed DSP-83 forms submitted by U.S. applicants.

You may now apply for Multi-Party Permits and Permits to Match Contracts

Defect Export Controls can now receive applications from a single applicant, who is applying on behalf of other applicants, and issue similar permits to each of the individuals or organisations listed on the application.

Applicants can also now apply for permits in which the export of goods, software or technology to overseas parties, and the expiration date of the permit, are more specifically aligned to the terms of a contract.

For more information on multi-party permits and permits to match contracts please go to the Apply for Multi-Party Permits and Permits to Match Contracts page.

You may now apply for broad Australian General Export Licences (AUSGELs)

As part of a risk-based approach to export licensing, DEC has developed Australian General Export Licences or AUSGELs that enable the export of a range of controlled goods, software and technologies to certain countries for certain purposes. AUSGELs are valid for five-years.

When applying for an AUSGEL, there is no requirement to list the goods and end-users as you would in an ordinary export application, as the item type and approved end-user destination countries are already on the pre-approved licence.

It is important to note that DEC will conduct a compliance history assessment of the AUSGEL applicant before an AUSGEL can be issued.

If an AUSGEL is not suitable to an applicant's particular circumstances, DEC will advise and work with you to provide an alternative permit arrangement.

There are five different AUSGEL types. Further information is available on the AUSGEL Page.

The AUSGEL application form is available from the Forms Page.

Guidance on complying with Australian export control laws is now available.

Guidance from Defence Export Controls (DEC) is available on DEC's compliance page and may assist organisations, and individuals to develop an effective export control compliance program, based on their individual circumstances.

The guidance includes:

  • key elements of an effective export control compliance program;
  • information on managing non-compliance with export controls;
  • tips for establishing and implementing export control compliance policies and procedures; and
  • a range of practical tools.

An internal export control compliance program may assist organisations to meet their obligations under Australia's export control legislation.

Guidance on new export control requirements from the Defence Trade Controls Act 2012 is available

New export controls for supplying and publishing Defence and Strategic Goods List (DSGL) technology and for brokering DSGL goods and technologies came into force on 2 April 2016. Individuals and organisations can apply for permits for the new controls.

Guidance information, to help individuals and organisations learn about the new export controls, is available on:

Question and answer scenarios on how the Defence Trade Controls Act 2012 impacts publications, conferences, educational instruction, research, correspondence and informal scientific exchanges, editing and peer review, commercial consulting, foreign nationals, patented information, sanctions, travelling and working overseas and records management is available on the 'Export Controls Training' page under the 'scenarios' tab.

Defence is working with stakeholders as they establish internal compliance arrangements by providing implementation support through outreach and engagement sessions.

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