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S9C1 - PRODUCTION PLANNING AND CONTROL

Table of Contents

APPLICABILITY OF AAP7001.059 SECTION 9

INTRODUCTION

MAINTENANCE GOVERNANCE

Maintenance Performance

FLEET MANAGEMENT

PRODUCTION PLANNING AND CONTROL

PP&C Enabling Functions

Information Management and Productivity Improvement

Maintenance Coordination

Task Planning and Control (TP&C)

Flightline Operations

Workforce Management

PRODUCTION PLANNING AND CONTROL PRINCIPLES

  • Units shall establish a performance-balanced culture, through implementation of PP&C principles, to ensure optimal utilisation of ADF resources in achieving capability outcomes to the required standard.
  • Units shall integrate and synchronise relevant operations, supply, maintenance and engineering inputs from Unit, FEG, SPO and support agencies to achieve productivity outcomes.
  • Units shall implement a productivity improvement, information and performance management program to ensure optimal utilisation of ADF resources.

APPLICABILITY OF AAP7001.059 SECTION 9

1. Production Planning and Control PP&C is not mandatory for TAREG compliance, but rather a set of principles that are essential to deliver capability efficiency and improve productivity whilst retaining safety. The introduction of a principles-based approach to maintenance productivity allows Units to respond appropriately to complex circumstances surrounding the management of whole of unit performance.

2. Increased organisational accountability through enhanced qualitative information in support of sound decision making are key to productivity improvements. The principles-based approach provides a better understanding of how to achieve these unit objectives because the concept:

  1. focuses on the intent of the guidance and encourages the exercise of professional judgement
  2. prevents the development of a mechanistic, ‘box-ticking’ approach to decision making
  3. provides guidance that can be applied to variations in circumstances that arise in practice
  4. can cope with rapid changes of the environment, which is anticipated upon adoption and further development of PP&C practices.

3. Unit feedback regarding a principles-based policy approach and other concepts introduced within this section are encouraged through the publication sponsor.

INTRODUCTION

4. The maintenance function is a critical enabler of ADF Aviation capability, involving the operational use of technical equipment. Maintenance must be conducted within the ADF aviation technical integrity framework to assure safety and airworthiness during restoration of materiel, in preparation for use. This technical integrity framework ensures compliant and conforming maintenance outcomes, with assurance performed through a Quality Management System (QMS).

5. Traditionally, this publication has focused on maintenance management activities that support technical integrity of ADF aircraft and aeronautical product. Optimised operational availability requires more than compliance and conformance to approved corporate procedures. Maintenance requires the support of skilled personnel and significant resources, which must be professionally managed to achieve the best capability outcomes. Sustained improvement of maintenance management systems towards higher productivity, performance and innovation objectives are necessary for efficient delivery of capability.

MAINTENANCE GOVERNANCE

6. Governance is a system that contributes to overall confidence in ADF Aviation maintenance capability. Confidence is based on three primary outcomes of compliance, conformance and performance:

  1. Compliance, whereby the maintenance management systems comply with regulatory, legal, and legislated requirements and policy.
  2. Conformance, whereby units conducting maintenance conform to the compliant maintenance management systems.
  3. Performance, whereby operations, maintenance and supply is organised and managed to efficiently meet the demands placed upon it in terms of tasking and preparation for future sustainment.

Maintenance Performance

7. Unit Maintenance Management Plans and Standing Instructions incorporate productivity and performance aspects in addition to compliance and conformance elements. This ensures integration with existing systems, whilst providing organisational transformation towards a performance-balanced culture in delivering capability. A balance between compliance, conformance and performance must be maintained to ensure highly productive ADF maintenance capability is delivered to required quality standards.

8. To establish a performance culture the following elements are essential:

  1. Leadership commitment from within the maintenance domain for improving performance, whilst maintaining Safety and Airworthiness standards.
  2. Creation of a unified organisational environment, through development and implementation of performance focussed processes and policy.
  3. Alignment of maintenance outcomes with organisational objectives to deliver operational preparedness.
  4. Development of effect-based metrics to measure, analyse and improve unit performance outcomes and underpinning processes.
  5. Develop information and reporting systems to achieve operational, engineering, maintenance and supply team’s performance goals.

9. Successful performance culture is supported by a strong relationship between AMO QMS and the elements detailed above. Therefore, the QMS is integral to improved unit performance, effectiveness and efficiency. Generation of a performance culture, combined with a continuous airworthiness and safety approach, will enhance delivery of ADF capability.

10. Figure 1 illustrates the relationships required for delivery of an efficient and effective maintenance capability. High performance levels can only be achieved once maintenance management activities are synchronised with supply, engineering and operations disciplines. Therefore, integration and cooperation of these functions is essential to deliver performance-aware maintenance outcomes.

AMMMS9C1 FIG 1

Figure 1 - ADF Aviation Logistics Relationships

FLEET MANAGEMENT

11. Fleet management (FM) is a capability enabler that ensures assets are managed in a considered and sustainable way, assuring those assets will satisfy operational requirements throughout life of type. Fleet management encompasses a variety of activities ranging from the strategic management of capability to tactical level tasks in support of preparing an airframe for an operational mission. FM is described as having the following components:

  1. Fleet Planning. Holistic management of same-type platforms, using a common set of guidelines to ensure balanced usage across the fleet, assuring capability delivery of that fleet throughout its life of type. Fleet planning is the responsibility of Force Element Groups (FEGs) in collaboration with System Programs Offices (SPOs), with contributions provided at Unit level through optimised fleet usage.
  2. Fleet Usage Optimisation (FUO). Management of individual platforms to ensure usage rates (i.e. flying hours and fatigue) are maintained, within tolerances, to meet maintenance stagger requirements established by fleet planners. FUO underpins fleet planning by ensuring fleet leaders and trailers are managed within the construct of the fleet plan. FUO is primarily the responsibility of units, with collaborative support from FEGs and SPOs.
  3. PP&C. PP&C optimises scheduled and unscheduled maintenance events, sets prioritisation, sequencing and allocates correct resources against identified operations, maintenance, supply and engineering requirements and controls execution. Units are responsible for performance of PP&C, although this will require collaborative support from SPO and supporting agencies.

PRODUCTION PLANNING AND CONTROL

12. PP&C is the tactical level implementation of FM and contributes to Defence preparedness. PP&C optimises resource utilisation in achieving efficiency in task execution, concurrent with performance measurement to support productivity improvement and is broken down as follows:

  1. Production, process of performing all actions to return aeronautical product to a serviceable state.
  2. Planning, construct a plan for the accomplishment, enactment, or attainment of an objective, considering scope and complexity of requirements.
  3. Control, exercising authoritative, direct control over the plan and associated resources while adjusting to evolving requirements.

13. The employment of PP&C practices ensures a performance focus in delivery of Defence’s required capabilities. Key to successful PP&C is sincere communication and relationship management (Section 9 Chapter 2) connecting the diverse array of supporting and enabling functions. The following functions provide a significant contribution to PP&C execution.

14. Units that utilise Production Planning and Control (PP&C) principles proactively plan whole of unit activity (production) and control execution of the plan. Maintenance Coordination, Task Planning and Control (TP&C), and Workforce Management are sub-elements and provide significant contribution to PP&C. These sub-elements are discussed in detail throughout Section 9.

PP&C Enabling Functions

15. There are a range of functions that positively contribute to the performance of PP&C. These functions are carried out across the unit by operations, maintenance, supply and engineering personnel and include:

  1. Fleet planning and usage optimisation
  2. Relationship management
  3. Flying operations
  4. Supply management
  5. Facilities scheduling
  6. System sustainment and support
  7. Human factors in maintenance
  8. Legislative and regulatory compliance and conformance assurance
  9. Operations, maintenance and supply data integrity and assurance.

Information Management and Productivity Improvement

16. Maintenance units seeking improved efficiency and productivity must establish information management and performance measures for three reasons:

  1. to lead the organisation in a chosen direction. Driving strategies and organisational change
  2. to manage resources needed to achieve goals by evaluating the effectiveness of action plans
  3. to employ unit work processes effectively and create opportunities to continuously improve.

17. The key to PP&C is to obtain information on workload, available resources and unit unique environmental conditions. This relies on information being effectively managed and communicated to unit decision makers, so that prioritisation of maintenance activities improves unit efficiency and productivity. Productivity Improvement should be implemented through periodic activity review and as opportunities are identified.

Maintenance Coordination

18. Maintenance Coordination (Section 9 Chapter 3) executes and maintains a viable and successful unit fleet plan. It is the act of assessment, planning and scheduling of maintenance activities, taking into account servicing and operational tasking requirements and timeframes. The successful conduct of Maintenance Coordination provides a range of benefits, including the following:

  1. Improved productivity. Such as, although not limited to, increased work through-put, resource availability and reduced delays.
  2. Increased maintenance efficiency. De-conflicting workforce allocations, resource usage optimised through educated allocation and scheduling.
  3. Establishment of control. Sets the priorities, standards and pre-determined goals against which performance is compared.
  4. Minimised uncertainty and optimised risk. Through proactive planning for future events.
  5. Innovation. Members from all levels have the opportunity to suggest ways and means for improving performance. Encourages creative thinking, leading to the development of new or improved methods.
  6. Increased morale. Creates an atmosphere of inclusion, order and discipline in the organisation. Employees know what is expected of them in advance, and it encourages them to work towards organisational and personal goals.

Task Planning and Control (TP&C)

19. TP&C (Section 9 Chapter 4) is the act of implementing the task level components of maintenance planning produced by the Maintenance Coordination function. The identification of resource requirements and Critical Paths within task planning is central to timely production of serviceable assets.

20. TP&C is conducted by Maintenance Managers (MM), Trade Supervisors (TS) or Self Certifying Tradespersons (SCT). MM, TS and SCT compliance and conformance roles are defined within Section 3 Chapter 1; however Section 9 Chapter 4 outlines how performance is achieved.

Flightline Operations

21. Flightline Operations execute the daily flying program as agreed between Operations and Maintenance. Flightline Operations will coordinate preparedness activities including flight servicings and replenishments.

Workforce Management

22. Appropriate workforce investment (Section 9 Chapter 5) will ensure all members have the required training, skill and experience levels for the positions and functions that they operate in. This investment contributes to maintaining good morale and demonstrates management support for the workforce.

23. Optimisation of workforce composition and structure includes rostering of personnel at the appropriate skill and rank level, in the right work function (mustering/category), at the right place and at the right time. This underpins the ability to meet the requirements of the flying program.

24. Applying Human Factors (HF) to all interactions between personnel, equipment, physical working environment and information will assist with overall workforce health. Further HF information can be found at the DDAAFS website.

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