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S3C3 - AIRCRAFT AND AERONAUTICAL PRODUCT MAINTENANCE

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION

THE OBJECTIVE OF MAINTENANCE

AIRCRAFT AND AERONAUTICAL PRODUCT MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENTS

Maintenance of Non-Maintenance Managed Items

APPROVED MAINTENANCE ORGANISATIONS

MAINTENANCE LEVELS

MAINTENANCE TYPES

Preventive Maintenance

Corrective Maintenance

SERVICEABILITY CRITERIA

Serviceability Decisions for Unclear or Undocumented Serviceability Criteria

RECORDING AND CERTIFICATION OF AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

CONTRACTOR WORKING PARTY

CONTRACTORS TECHNICAL REPRESENTATIVES

AIRCRAFT SUPPORT TEAM

AIRCRAFT SURVEY

Management

Periodicity

Additional Outcomes and Records

MAINTENANCE OF TRANSITING AIRCRAFT

Maintenance of Aircraft by ADF Personnel

International Logistics Agreements and Arrangements

INTRODUCTION

1. Maintenance is carried out on ADF aircraft and aeronautical product to ensure it is maintained in a condition that will enable it to perform the function for which it is designed, reliably and without failure during operation.

2. This chapter prescribes the Approved Maintenance Organisation (AMO) responsibilities when conducting and managing maintenance applied to aircraft and aeronautical product.

THE OBJECTIVE OF MAINTENANCE

3. The objective of ADF maintenance is to keep ADF aircraft and aeronautical product in an approved design condition such that it is safely operable and properly configured to meet its intended purpose. ADF maintenance activities ensure the preservation of the inherent levels of reliability and the optimisation of availability.

AIRCRAFT AND AERONAUTICAL PRODUCT MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENTS

4. Aircraft and aeronautical product are maintained in accordance with authorised maintenance data (refer Section 4 Chapter 1—Authorised Maintenance Data). Additionally, the management of aircraft and Maintenance Managed Items (MMIs) must be in accordance with the approved Technical Maintenance Plan (TMP).

5. The primary function of the TMP is to promulgate in a single document the approved maintenance policy for a given aircraft and applicable aeronautical product (the Application) and its constituent MMIs. TMPs define the following aspects of maintenance policy for a given application:

  1. the maintenance process, ie the maintenance to be performed
  2. the maintenance interval or life, ie when the maintenance is to be performed
  3. the authorised venue, ie where the maintenance is to be performed
  4. the trade responsibility, ie by whom the maintenance is to be performed
  5. the maintenance publication, ie how the maintenance is to be performed.

6. AAP 7001.038—Maintenance Requirements Determination (MRD) Manual, Section 4 provides a detailed description on aircraft TMPs.

Maintenance of Non-Maintenance Managed Items

7. Aeronautical Product that is not maintained under a TMP may still require maintenance to be performed on it in accordance with authorised maintenance data. This maintenance may be conducted within the AMO or by other approved external agencies. All maintenance must be recorded and certified as required by Section 4 Chapter 2—Recording and Certification of Aircraft and Aeronautical Product Maintenance.

APPROVED MAINTENANCE ORGANISATIONS

8. AMOs are responsible for carrying out maintenance on ADF aircraft and aeronautical product. The scope of maintenance performed by an AMO is defined and approved by the Technical Airworthiness Regulator (TAR). The responsibilities, organisation and requirements for an AMO are fully described in AAP 7001.053 - Electronic Technical Airworthiness Management Manual.

MAINTENANCE LEVELS

9. To optimise maintenance activities, AMOs are structured into:

  1. Operational Maintenance (OM)
  2. Deeper Maintenance (DM).

MAINTENANCE TYPES

10. There are two types of maintenance performed in the ADF to maintain aircraft for life-of-type:

  1. Preventive Maintenance (scheduled)
  2. Corrective Maintenance (unscheduled).

Preventive Maintenance

11. Preventive maintenance is maintenance intended to prevent or delay a failure from occurring and is further defined in AAP 7001.038.

12. Preventive maintenance is made up of four basic actions:

  1. lubrication/servicing
  2. on-condition
  3. hard time
  4. failure finding.

13. The maintenance policy deviation process from a scheduled preventive maintenance interval event, is addressed in Section 3 Chapter 2—Aircraft and Aeronautical Product Servicing.

Corrective Maintenance

14. Corrective Maintenance is maintenance intended to correct a failure after it has occurred and comprises those actions required to restore an aircraft or aeronautical product to a satisfactory condition or level of performance after either a functional failure has occurred or a potential failure has been detected. It may be performed on any aircraft or aeronautical product irrespective of whether preventive maintenance is also defined for the aircraft or aeronautical product.

15. The deferment of corrective maintenance is addressed by the Carried Forward Unserviceability (CFU) process detailed in Section 3 Chapter 11—Deferment of Required Maintenance.

16. Corrective maintenance is that unscheduled maintenance performed on an aircraft on an unplanned basis. The need for corrective maintenance may become apparent in-flight, during flight servicing or whilst carrying out maintenance.

17. Corrective maintenance includes those actions required to:

  1. rectify any unserviceability detected on an aircraft
  2. embody a Modification (MOD) or Design Deviation (DD)
  3. satisfy a Special Technical Instruction (STI)
  4. carry out a role or configuration change, or
  5. transfer serviceable aeronautical product between aircraft (cannibalisation).

18. Any corrective maintenance operation, which is completed during the course of unscheduled maintenance, may be ‘claimed’ and rescheduled accordingly.

19. When carrying out corrective maintenance, the aircraft must be released to maintenance unless one of the following provisions are invoked:

  1. ‘Maintenance following maintenance release and before captains acceptance’, or
  2. ‘Maintenance following maintenance release and captains acceptance’.

SERVICEABILITY CRITERIA

20. Serviceability criteria, such as limits, are applied to determine whether aeronautical product or an aircraft system is serviceable. It is not possible to determine serviceability without using serviceability criteria.

21. The Systems Program Office (SPO) will publish serviceability criteria relevant to a particular aeronautical product or an aircraft system and their associated equipment in authorised maintenance data. DGTA–ADF and SPOs may also publish, in generic authorised maintenance data, serviceability criteria relevant to aeronautical product used across multiple systems, for example, serviceability criteria relevant to aircraft wiring, structural repair, the integrity of fasteners, etc.

22. Serviceability criteria may require the measurement of a factor, such as fluid level, pressure, temperature, time, resistance, weight, leakage rate and physical dimensions. This measurement is then compared against a limit or value in the authorised maintenance data or servicing schedule.

23. In other cases, serviceability criteria may require maintenance personnel to apply their training and experience to determine whether, for example, there is ‘free play’, ‘corrosion’, ‘contamination by oil and grease’, ‘adequate clearance’ or ‘loose rivets and fasteners’.

Serviceability Decisions for Unclear or Undocumented Serviceability Criteria

24. There may be instances when the serviceability state of aeronautical product is in question due to unclear or undocumented Serviceability Criteria in authorised maintenance data. When multiple authorised maintenance data detail conflicting serviceability limits, the most conservative limit must be used. Where no serviceability limit has been set or the existing limits are unclear, then a serviceability limit of nil allowable damage, eg crack/leakage/tolerance/malfunction is to be assumed and the AMO must seek authoritative advice from the SPO before making the aeronautical product serviceable.

RECORDING AND CERTIFICATION OF AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE

25. Recording and certification of aircraft maintenance must be entered in the appropriate aircraft or aeronautical product maintenance recording and certification system in accordance with Section 4 Chapter 2.

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

26. The Parent AMO and relevant Force Element Group (FEG) or Wing Headquarters, as appropriate are charged with providing operational level support to detached flights and should be the first point of contact when technical assistance is required. Technical assistance may also be sought from Defence and/or civilian sources when required. Technical assistance may be required to provide specific expertise, equipment on loan or additional manpower. Examples of technical assistance that may be sought are assistance for the embodiment of complex aircraft modifications, or extensive aircraft repairs that are beyond the resources of an AMO.

27. In the first instance, the requirement for technical assistance should be satisfied within the FEG/AMO as appropriate; however, if the requirement is beyond FEG/AMO resources, a request is to be directed to the responsible SPO. Requests for technical assistance are to contain the following information as a minimum:

  1. extent of the work or technical assistance required, including manpower requirement estimates, if possible
  2. number of aircraft or quantity of aeronautical product involved
  3. location of aircraft/aeronautical product
  4. priority of the request with the required completion date
  5. impact of receiving no assistance.

28. Any subsequent alterations to the request are to be reported promptly to the responsible SPO and FEG Headquarters (FEGHQ) so that appropriate amendments to the original work order may be initiated.

29. The sponsor SPO may arrange technical assistance to be undertaken by:

  1. a Contractor Working Party (CWP)
  2. a contractors technical representative, or
  3. an ADF working party, staffed from available AMO personnel.

30. In all circumstances the extent of work required by the CWP is to be kept to a minimum by ensuring that all preparatory work has been carried out. The Senior Maintenance Manager (SMM) or delegate is to ensure maintenance personnel are available to carry out any additional work that might be required which is not covered by the work order.

CONTRACTOR WORKING PARTY

31. A CWP is only to be employed on the work covered by the work order. The CWP should not be called upon before all the necessary modification kits and/or parts, other than those for which arrangements have been made for supply by the contractor, are available at the repair venue.

32. Notification of Completion. When a CWP completes the task for which it is contracted, the ADF contract manager is to notify the responsible SPO and FEGHQ in writing that work has been completed in accordance with the contract/work order.

33. Reports. A written report must be compiled by the contract authority in consultation with the AMO, detailing the work carried out by the CWP. The original copy of the report is to be forwarded to the ADF nominated contract manager, one copy is to be forwarded to the responsible SPO and one copy is to be retained by the AMO. The report is to contain the:

  1. SPO order number
  2. CWP order number
  3. serial number of aircraft, engine or aeronautical product concerned
  4. serial numbers of major components and/or MMIs removed and installed by the CWP
  5. work-hours expended by the CWP on task
  6. written description of the work carried out.

34. The report must be supplied by the contract authority concerned on completion of the work by the CWP, unless otherwise instructed by the responsible SPO.

35. Inspection of Flying Controls and Other Systems. Where flying controls and other systems have been dismantled/disturbed by a contractor to facilitate a work order, the following procedures are to be complied with, unless the work is being inspected by an ADF authorised inspector:

  1. The SMM, or delegate, is to obtain from the contractors inspector, a certificate of inspection. The certificate is to cover the independent inspections carried out in accordance with this publication.
  2. If any inspection reveals previous damage or unacceptable wear, the defects are to be reported to the SMM or delegate. The rectification of these defects is the responsibility of the custodian/parent AMO and not the responsibility of the contractor.
  3. In circumstances where inspections are unable to be carried out by the CWP, the aircraft may be accepted from the CWP on completion of the repair, if a certificate is provided detailing controls and/or systems disturbed or disconnected during repair. In these cases the AMO SMM, or delegate, is responsible for ensuring that the necessary work and inspections are carried out before flight. Any defects found which stem from the CWP work are to be reported immediately to the responsible SPO.

CONTRACTORS TECHNICAL REPRESENTATIVES

36. Contractor technical representatives are available for supplying technical expertise and information on engines, aircraft systems and/or aeronautical product that they have been contracted to supply or maintain on behalf of the ADF.

37. Certain contractors have ‘free service’ representatives, who work directly under their control. These representatives may visit AMOs and air capable ships. Arrangements for these visits are to be made through the responsible SPO who will liaise with the FEG and responsible Commanding Officer (CO).

38. After each visit, the representative should forward a brief report to the responsible SPO detailing outcomes and other relevant information.

39. Any assistance offered by a technical representative must be approved by the responsible SPO prior to acceptance.

40. Immediately the services of a representative are no longer necessary, the responsible SPO is to be notified to enable formal closing of the agreement or contract.

AIRCRAFT SUPPORT TEAM

41. Aircraft Support Teams may be formed to provide specialised maintenance support to ADF Aviation AMOs, Ship’s flights and deployments to meet unusual maintenance contingencies that cannot be satisfactorily met from the manpower or material resources of the individual AMO or Ship's flight. The activity of the team is normally confined to aircraft repair remote from the parent AMO, where the operational level maintenance capability or capacity is insufficient.

42. The activity of the team includes, but is not limited to:

  1. airframe structural repairs
  2. providing assistance as directed, and undertake other maintenance which is considered beyond the capability of the AMO, Flight or detachment
  3. incorporating major high priority modifications
  4. performing major aeronautical product changes
  5. performing troubleshooting.

43. The Officer-in-Charge (OIC) of the team is responsible for:

  1. developing and maintaining the orders and procedures necessary for the efficient management of team personnel
  2. ensuring appropriate certification of aircraft repairs carried out by the team
  3. ensuring the development and maintenance of a ready use kit of tools and spares which are likely to be required to meet contingencies
  4. ensuring the nominated technicians are prepared for deployment on 72 hours notice
  5. ensuring that the nominated technicians have current medical inoculations and official passports
  6. ensuring that duty statements reflect any specialist skills required to meet perceived team activities additional to normal duties.

AIRCRAFT SURVEY

44. Aircraft survey is a management tool that allows the in-service material state of aircraft to be monitored for the purpose of planning aircraft rework or restoration requirements. It also provides the opportunity to independently assess the effectiveness of maintenance programs in preserving aircraft materiel condition. The main focus of a survey is to assess the aircraft’s condition through a physical audit at a predetermined time within the aircraft’s servicing schedule when the aircraft is unserviceable for planned maintenance. A survey may also be undertaken during or at the completion of, a period where the aircraft has been operated under contingency maintenance. The survey provides a basis for judgements as to whether an aircraft should be removed from service for rectification work, or whether an aircraft rework should be planned, and if the aircraft is suitable to return to service for the next survey periodicity. The overall aim is to allow aircraft rectification work to be planned, funded and managed. For industry and the responsible SPO to organise a satisfactory rework, induction must be planned and programmed well in advance. In addition, a well-defined work package is essential to define the rework required.

45. A survey is also a prudent means of sampling the effect of corrosion preventative measures and maintenance routines for a new aircraft type when first deployed in an adverse environment, eg at sea on an air-capable ship, to determine whether recommended maintenance practices should be modified.

Note

Navy Only. Naval Aircraft Surveys are to be carried out by Aviation Maintenance Standards (AMS). The scope of the survey is to be determined by the survey officer in consultation with the aircraft custodian. The survey should be conducted without stripping and possibly in conjunction with a zonal or similar inspection. A copy of the survey report, with maintenance effectiveness comments or recommendations for change, is to be forwarded to Naval Aviation Systems Program Office MRD to enable evaluation of the effectiveness of the service regime (refer paragraphs 51 and 52).

Air Force and Army. Aircraft surveys are not currently carried out on AMO aircraft; however, this process may be instigated at the discretion of the SMM, FEG or sponsor SPO.

46. Defects. During the course of a survey, defects which impact technical airworthiness may be discovered, which will require rectification. In all cases the survey team will enter these defects in the aircrafts recording and certification system. Rectification of any such defects will normally be the responsibility of the SMM or delegate, but if the survey officer considers the rectification to be beyond the capabilities or resources of the AMO, SPO assistance is recommended.

Management

47. Calendar Time (CT) is normally the basis to be used for scheduling aircraft to survey. The survey process will include a detailed inspection of the aircraft and its systems and may include a full Maintenance Test Flight (MTF). Where appropriate, the MTF should be undertaken as part of the survey process. The Flight Test Report (FTR) is to be attached to the detailed inspection report; together these forms make up the complete survey report. Surveys are arranged and managed by the responsible SPO. Aircraft surveys are to be carried out by a team of experienced staff under the supervision of an engineer officer authorised by the FEG, and supplemented by specialist personnel from in-service support agencies as appropriate. Promulgation of procedures and documentation requirements are the SPOs responsibility.

NOTE

Navy Only. A full MTF is not required for the conduct of a Naval Aircraft Survey. AMS will manage Naval Aircraft Surveys to enable effective use of resources for both AMS and the operating AMO.

48. Allotment for Survey. At the discretion of the responsible SPO, aircraft may be allotted to an appropriate ADF agency or contractor AMO for survey. A replacement aircraft will not normally be allotted.

Periodicity

49. The period between surveys will be determined by the responsible SPO and should be as long as prudently possible without compromising technical airworthiness, safety or materiel state.

NOTE

Navy Only. Surveys of Naval aircraft are normally planned to occur annually due to the naval operating environment and is used as the prime monitoring method for analysing the effectiveness of the system of maintenance for Naval aircraft for the environment in which they operate.

50. Subsequent surveys shall be scheduled by the responsible SPO on completion of an assessment based on previous surveys of the particular aircraft, giving consideration to any progressive deterioration identified and the projected operating environment. Two years CT should be the minimum period between surveys, however, this may be varied at the discretion of the responsible SPO.

Additional Outcomes and Records

51. Throughout an aircrafts service life, and depending on its various operating environments, aircraft surveys will gauge the effectiveness of existing maintenance programs and contribute to reliability based maintenance assessments of routine servicings, thus allowing adjustment to servicing schedules. The conduct of an aircraft survey is particularly important following a period of operation under contingency maintenance to ensure the aircraft’s condition is thoroughly assessed and appropriate rectification work is undertaken to restore material integrity for achievement of expected Life-of-Type. Prescribed contingency maintenance activities may also need reviewing where deficiencies may be evident. The survey also assesses the affects of any battle damage repair to determine what repairs should be the subject of engineering review when repairs are outside the scope of those prescribed in the aircrafts Structural Repair Manual.

52. Comprehensive records of surveys and the associated analyses are to be retained for the Life-of-Type by the responsible SPO and subsequently archived in accordance with Government archiving policy. Survey reports, including constructive comments and advice of follow up actions intended by the responsible SPO, will be provided to the aircraft Custodian/AMO.

MAINTENANCE OF TRANSITING AIRCRAFT

Maintenance of Aircraft by ADF Personnel

53. For transiting aircraft, the visited AMO must obtain authorisation to perform any maintenance on that aircraft. All maintenance actions are to be documented in accordance with the transiting aircraft's maintenance instructions. The AMO personnel performing the maintenance must consider their responsibilities under Section 3 Chapter 1—Performance, Supervision, Inspection and Management of Maintenance within an AMO.

International Logistics Agreements and Arrangements

54. The ADF uses bilateral agreements with allies and friendly countries to access resources for logistics support. Similarly, these nations may use the same agreements for support from the ADF. DEFLOGMAN, Volume 8 Part 2 Chapter 3—International Logistics Agreements and Arrangements provides information on co-operative logistics arrangements established between the ADF and other nations.

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