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S8C21 - AVIATION PETROLEUM, OILS AND LUBRICANTS

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION

PETROLEUM, OILS AND LUBRICANTS PUBLICATIONS

AMO FUEL INTEGRITY MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENTS

Daily Water Drain Inspection

Aircraft Fuel Tank Levels

Examination of Fuel After Periods of Storage

Aircraft Containing F–37 (JP–8 + 100)

Quarantining Fuel after Incident/Accident

Fuel Spills

ADDITIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES

Storage/Shelf Life

WHS and the Environment

Disposal of Waste or Contaminated Lubricants or Allied Products

INTRODUCTION

1. Petroleum, Oils and Lubricants (POL) are subject to deterioration and contamination of various types, in both storage and dispensing equipment. A quality assurance system is required to prevent deteriorated or contaminated POL from endangering aircraft and aeronautical products.

2. This chapter prescribes the Approved Maintenance Organisation (AMO) responsibilities and procedures to be followed to effectively manage the quality assurance of POL.

PETROLEUM, OILS AND LUBRICANTS PUBLICATIONS

3. DEF(AUST)5695B—Petroleum Oils and Lubricants Manual defines the technical integrity program to be applied to assure the safety, fitness for service and environmental compliance of ADF POL. DEF(AUST)5695B is primarily aimed at the base/establishment level as the majority of technical integrity management activities occur prior to fuel being delivered to AMOs. However, DEF(AUST)5695B Part 1 details issues such as Fuel Quality Control (FQC) responsibilities, training requirements and Work Health and Safety (WHS) issues which may affect personnel. AMOs are to ensure they have access to this publication as a reference document which is available as a hard copy or online via the Fuel Services Branch (FSB) website. The requirements of DEF(AUST)5695B do not take precedence over Systems Program Office (SPO) approved maintenance data.

4. DEF(AUST)206F—Petroleum Oils and Lubricants Handbook provides storage/shelf life requirements for POL products. All AMOs who store POL products (bulk or packaged) are to hold adequate copies of this publication to ensure storage/shelf life requirements, including testing requirements, are conducted to maintain the technical integrity. DEF(AUST)206F also provides general information relating to POL products, and specifies acceptable alternatives. Information in this publication does not take precedence over SPO approved maintenance data.

5. For ADF fuels, very simple requirements exist at AMO level to maintain fuel technical integrity. These requirements are described below and are not covered by DEF(AUST)5695B. The most important issue to be understood by staff is that DEF(AUST)5695B requires each base/establishment to have an appointed Base FQC Officer (BFQCO) and a Base FQC Manager (BFQCM). These positions are central to the ongoing technical integrity management of fuel, and AMOs must have a system in place that ensures staff are aware of who fills these positions, and how they are to be contacted in the event of any fuel issues. FSB POLENG(AIR) may also be contacted for assistance. AMO FQC appointments are necessary only where access to Base staff is not available, eg overseas deployments.

AMO FUEL INTEGRITY MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENTS

6. Regular draining to remove free water present in aircraft fuel tanks is essential for the following reasons:

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Fuel System Icing Inhibitor (FSII) is a hazardous substance and may be harmful in contact with the skin or if inhaled. Water/FSII mixtures have the solvency of paint remover. As a result, fuel and water drained from aircraft tanks is to be handled with care and disposed of in accordance with approved local instructions.

  1. FSII is added to military fuels to lower the freeze point of entrained and free water present in the fuel, thereby reducing the likelihood of fuel-system icing events. By design, FSII dissolves in water preferentially to fuel. If regular tank drains are not performed, the amount of FSII in the fuel will be depleted through preferential dissolution into free water, increasing the likelihood of future in-flight fuel system icing events.
  2. Microbiological Contamination (MBC) typically grows at fuel-water interfaces. Regular tank drains remove free water in aircraft tanks and the fuel-water interface, reducing the likelihood of MBC occurring. Whilst a secondary benefit of FSII is to act as a biostatic, removal of the water-fuel interface remains essential in preventing MBC from occurring.
  3. Water/FSII mixtures have the solvency of paint remover and can damage aircraft fuel system components if left in aircraft tanks.

Daily Water Drain Inspection

7. Unless otherwise directed by the responsible SPO, a daily water drain and inspection is to be carried out on all aircraft, including aircraft in maintenance/storage. This water drain and inspection is not required for aircraft with fuel tanks completely drained of fuel.

8. The daily water drain and inspection involves draining adequate fuel from aircraft fuel tank drain point(s) to ensure that there is no free water remaining in the tank, and then visually inspecting that the fuel is "clear and bright". DEF(AUST)5695 provides a procedure, including a definition for "clear and bright", that must be referred to if aircraft specific maintenance publications are inadequate. Any visual evidence of undissolved water, sediment or any other contaminant is cause for rejection of the sample. If the fuel sample fails the first "clear and bright" inspection, successive samples may be taken. If, in the opinion of the maintainer, an excessive amount of fuel has been drawn off before a "clear and bright" sample is obtained, or if MBC is suspected from any of the samples taken, the aircraft is to be placed unserviceable and BFQCO and FSB (as deemed necessary) notified.

Aircraft Fuel Tank Levels

9. Where possible, aircraft should be fully refuelled as soon as practicable on completion of an operation, to minimise the amount of moisture drawn into the tanks as they 'breathe'. If a complete refuel is not practicable due to subsequent aircraft operations, the aircraft should be refuelled to the maximum extent possible.

Examination of Fuel After Periods of Storage

10. Where fuel in aircraft tanks has been stored without use, ie has remained completely dormant, for 3 months for areas between the Tropic of Capricorn and Tropic of Cancer, or 6 months or more for all other areas, the aircraft shall be placed unserviceable and FSB contacted, requesting the fuel be tested and re-certified.

11. If fuel stored without use for these periods is to be defuelled, staff shall also notify the BFQCO or BFQCM to ensure defuelled fuel is handled appropriately. DEF(AUST)5695B Part 4 provides additional information.

Aircraft Containing F-37 (JP-8+100)

12. The introduction of F–37 (also known as JP–8+100) into ADF Bulk Fuel Installations is not permitted at this time, refer DEF(AUST)5695B. Where F–37 must be defuelled for operational reasons, the AMO shall advise defuel operators and the BFQCO so that appropriate steps may be taken to handle the F–37 appropriately.

Quarantining Fuel after Incident/Accident

13. For fuel quarantining/testing after an aircraft incident/accident refer DEF(AUST)5695B Part 4.

Fuel Spills

14. The AMO should contact the BFQCO for advice on any fuel spill occurrence. Fuel spill procedures are defined in DEF(AUST)5695B Part 1.

ADDITIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES

Storage/Shelf Life

15. Unless otherwise specified in AEO (SPO) authorised maintenance documentation, AMOs are to comply with the storage/shelf life inspection requirements defined in DEF(AUST)206F.

WHS and the Environment

16. POL products must be handled with care and in accordance with the products SDS. Minimum PPE requirements and other WHS information concerning POL products is contained in Part 1 of DEF(AUST)5695B.

Disposal of Waste or Contaminated Lubricants or Allied Products

17. Under no circumstances are lubricants or allied products to be disposed of without due consideration to the environment. In particular, contamination of waterways and ground water is to be avoided. Wherever possible these products are to be returned to an ADF base or ship for disposal.

18. Waste or contaminated lubricants are to be disposed of as follows:

  1. At Parent Base. In the ‘Waste Oil Pits’ or ‘Receptacles’ provided.
  2. On Air Capable Ships. In accordance with the ships disposal procedures.
  3. Deployed Aircraft. In accordance with Australian ‘parent base’ requirements, or requirement applicable at the deployed location, whichever is the more stringent. Products may also be packaged for transportation to Australia for disposal.
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