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S8C13 - CONDITION MONITORING PROGRAMS FOR PROPULSION SYSTEMS

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION

SYSTEM DESCRIPTION

FAILURE MODES

CONDITION MONITORING TECHNIQUES

Oil Condition Analysis

Remote Visual Inspection

Temperature Monitoring

MAINTENANCE DOCUMENTATION

CONDITION MONITORING TRAINING AND AUTHORISATION

Condition Monitoring Operator Authorisation

Condition Monitoring Supervisor Authorisation

CONDITION MONITORING DATA MANAGEMENT

Procedures

CONDITION MONITORING ALERT LEVELS AND CODES

Defect Reports

ENGINEERING DECISIONS

CONDITION MONITORING PROGRAM REVIEWS

Key Performance Indicators

ORGANISATIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES

Systems Program Office

Approved Maintenance Organisations

Condition Monitoring Centres

Directorate of Aviation Engineering

Non-Destructive Testing and Composite Technologies

Defence Science and Technology Organisation

Aerospace Materiel System Program Office

Annexes

A. SOA Program

B. WDA Guidance

C. Vibration Analysis Guidance

D. Performance Monitoring Guidance

INTRODUCTION

1. A Condition Monitoring (CM) program is a coordinated activity that constantly or periodically collects data that can be used to trend and indicate machine condition or ‘health’ against an acceptable limit, prior to in-service failure. Proper analysis and trending of CM data can minimise in-service failures, thereby assuring technical airworthiness, improving reliability, availability and minimising maintenance and logistics costs. An effective CM program forms a key part of a Reliability, Availability and Maintainability (RAM) program. As required of DEFLOGMAN Part 2 Vol 10 Chap 14 - Materiel Reliability, Availability and Maintainability Policy, the Australian Defence Organisation (ADO) has a responsibility to ensure that RAM is applied to all phases of the materiel life cycle in the interest of achieving readiness and sustainability objectives at minimum cost of ownership.

2. Mechanical systems can provide indications of gradual failure modes, which can be trended with time and usage through CM tasks. CM tasks can also be referred to as ‘on-condition’ tasks, which support a preventive maintenance program, refer AAP 7001.038—Maintenance Requirements Determination (MRD) Manual. The contents of this chapter are applicable to any aircraft mechanical system that has CM techniques prescribed by the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) or warrant the introduction of a CM program to manage gradual failure modes. In the context of a CM program, the propulsion system should include the transmission system for helicopter aircraft.

3. In general, propulsion system OEMs do not evaluate the effectiveness of their prescribed CM techniques. Therefore ADF assurance of the effectiveness of CM programs from an economic and technical airworthiness perspective is required. An effective CM program requires five distinct phases that operate in a continuous cycle as follows:

  1. Detection. This involves data collection, processing and the use of instruments to detect failure symptoms using CM techniques.
  2. Diagnosis. This is the analysis of CM data or sets of failure symptoms to ascertain the origin or cause of the symptom(s).
  3. Prognosis. This is the determination of any remaining life using experience and/or reliability data.
  4. Prescription. This is the identification of the action to be taken, eg maintenance action or more stringent monitoring.
  5. Post Mortem. Determines, from system or component tear down, whether the CM program was successful in detecting a problem, and recommends action eg modifications or maintenance changes to eliminate the root cause, or revised CM alert levels. This is the most important phase requiring analysis of all CM data.

4. A CM program is a progressive pro-active maintenance philosophy based on a process of regular data collection and trending that identifies emerging fault trends as mechanical systems gradually wear during service. As such, the process of data collection needs to be regular, efficient and effective for the program to be easily implemented and of maximum benefit. For systems that are maintained using fixed scheduled servicing, CM data can also be used to justify maintenance extensions when limits are being met. Since an effective CM program can avoid costly in-service failures that generate unscheduled major repairs and be used to justify maintenance extensions, there is the potential for significant cost savings in spare parts and maintenance costs.

5. To ensure gas turbine Engine Structural Integrity (ESI), TAREG 3. 5. 5—Engine Structural Integrity Management requires effective CM programs for gas turbine engines to be documented in either a CM Program Plan (CMPP) or in a section of the ESI Management Plan (ESIMP). Refer to AAP 7001.054—Electronic Airworthiness Design Requirements Manual for guidance on document formats for CMPPs and ESIMPs. For propulsion systems fitted to rotary wing aircraft, the CMPP needs to capture CM requirements for the gas turbine and transmission system (TX).

6. This chapter prescribes the Approved Maintenance Organisation (AMO) responsibilities and requirements for the development and implementation of effective CM programs for propulsion systems.

7. Each CM program and the associated data collection and trend analysis intervals will depend on specific configurations and failure modes. A useful source of generic guidance for rotating machinery is the ABR 6140—Condition Monitoring Manual.

SYSTEM DESCRIPTION

8. The CM Program Plan needs to describe the configuration of the system being monitored. In particular, it should include the lubrication system and any Maintainability features that the OEM may have included during design such as magnetic chip detectors, boroscope inspection ports and hard-wired accelerometers. To support the lubrication system description, a Propulsion System Metal Map (PSMM) is important to document the material that each oil wetted component is made of to enable the respective AMO or SPO to identify the origin of collected wear debris.

FAILURE MODES

9. The CM techniques recommended by an OEM or introduced by the ADF need to be applicable to specific failure modes that the propulsion system is known to be prone to. Failure modes should be identified by the OEM during the design phase through a Failure Modes Effects and Criticality Analysis (FMECA). The CMPP should describe the systems being monitored and identify the applicable failure modes. Additionally, the applicable CM techniques should be identified against each failure mode. Additional failure modes are likely to evolve in service, particularly if the usage is different to the OEM design assumptions. Typical failure modes for propulsion systems include, but are not limited to;

  1. wear of bearing elements and bearing races
  2. wear of gears and splines
  3. cracked rotating components such as gears in transmission systems
  4. cracked supporting structures such as gas turbine engine casings and gearbox casings
  5. misalignment of rotating components
  6. unbalance of rotating components such as propellers, shafts and turbines
  7. low power output
  8. high operating temperatures
  9. fuel nozzle streaking.

CONDITION MONITORING TECHNIQUES

10. CM techniques are recommended by the OEM at the time of service introduction or can be introduced by the ADF should OEM-recommended techniques become outdated or ineffective. CM techniques typically used on ADF propulsion systems include, but are not limited to:

  1. Performance Monitoring (PM)
  2. Wear Debris Analysis (WDA)
  3. Spectrometric Oil Analysis (SOA)
  4. Oil Condition Analysis (OCA)
  5. Vibration Analysis (VA)
  6. Remote Visual Inspection (RVI)
  7. Temperature monitoring.

11. The applicability of these techniques will depend on the system design, typical failure modes and OEM recommendations. PM is typically required for all applications as a matter of course, but OEMs rarely mandate trending of data. Hence, the ADF needs to consider OEM-recommended maintenance activities as a bare minimum and evaluate the effectiveness of these activities in service.

12. SOA and WDA are useful for monitoring the levels of foreign material suspended within a lubricating oil system. Foreign materials can be produced by:

  1. normal wear and tear
  2. deterioration of the system due to technical defects
  3. deterioration of the system due to operation outside specified limits
  4. inadvertent contamination.

13. Oil debris analysis is achieved by qualitative and/or quantitative evaluation of the debris collected. SOA can be used to evaluate minuscule debris (up to 10 microns in diameter). WDA can be used to analyse debris collected by Magnetic Chip Detectors (MCD) and oil filters, ie typically greater than 15 microns in diameter.

14. A single CM technique should not be used in isolation to determine engine serviceability. For example, turbine degradation may be indicated by PM data but should be further confirmed through RVI before embarking upon an expensive Hot Section Inspection or Bay Service (BS). Increasing SOA trends can be complemented by WDA. For rotary wing aircraft engaged in ship-borne operations, it may be prudent to perform more regular WDA and VA whilst SOA samples are being processed at land-based facilities.

15. For a specific CM program, the applicable techniques should be summarised in a table in the CMPP, which includes the intervals at which CM data is collected and the applicable special servicing number. Regular CM activities should appear as special ‘S’ servicing in the applicable Technical Maintenance Plan (TMP) to provide clear visibility of the implementation and reporting requirements.

16. Further details on SOA Programs (including equipment correlation and calibration), WDA, VA and PM are contained in Annexes A to D respectively. Note that commercial and military laboratories participating in ADF aviation SOA Programs are to calibrate and correlate their equipment in accordance with Annex A.

Oil Condition Analysis

17. Oil condition analysis refers to assessing the chemical and physical properties of the oil (rather than the entrained particulate). The condition of the oil is important as it directly influences the ability of the oil to perform functions such as lubrication and protection against corrosion. Deterioration of the oil condition can lead to problems such as corrosion and accelerated wear of components. As a minimum requirement, lubrication oils should be monitored for water content and viscosity. Where gas turbine lubricating oils pass through an oil/fuel heat exchanger, the lubricating oil should be monitored for fuel dilution.

18. Another valuable parameter that can be monitored is the Total Acid Number (TAN). TAN gives an indication of the potential of the oil to corrode unprotected metal surfaces, such as the internal surfaces of gearboxes.

19. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy can be used to provide most oil condition measurement parameters including those mentioned above. The FTIR emits an absorbency spectrum of the individual organic compounds within an oil sample. This spectrum can be compared to new oil or established parameters. Oil anomalies evaluated by FTIR include:

  1. thermal/oxidative degradation
  2. water/fuel contamination
  3. incorrect lubricant
  4. additive depletion.

Remote Visual Inspection

20. Using videoscope equipment a RVI can be carried out by feeding optical fibre scopes through dedicated inspection ports or other means of access such as the engine inlet, engine exhaust, removal of fuel nozzles or removal of igniter plugs. It is the least scientific and yet the most effective at confirming damage, providing that state of the art videoscope equipment is used and access can be gained to engine internals. Maintenance manuals for older aircraft types may refer to the use of outdated optical boroscope equipment that are ineffective. Ideally SPOs and AMOs should ensure that state of the art equipment is utilised when outdated and ineffective equipment is prescribed by the OEM.

Temperature Monitoring

21. Although not usually required as a matter of course, temperature monitoring can be achieved by using temperature sensitive labels which enables monitoring and measurement of temperatures in aircraft under operating conditions where instrumentation is impractical or unwarranted. The labels indicate a specific temperature or sequence of temperature measurements by a visual change of colour. The colour change is irreversible and the performance of the labels is not affected by transient contact with contaminants, eg solvents, fuels, or lubricants. Authorisation for use is vested with the applicable SPO.

MAINTENANCE DOCUMENTATION

22. The installation and removal of any equipment required to perform CM (such as vibration analysers or videoscope equipment) is to be annotated in the recording and certification system and transferred to the Change of Configuration Section (CCS) in accordance with the systems approved instructions.

23. Where there is also the requirement to perform in-flight data collection, eg for PM or VA, the requirement is to be annotated in recording and certification system and transferred to the Special Maintenance Requirement (SMR) section of the recording and certification system in accordance with the systems approved instructions.

CONDITION MONITORING TRAINING AND AUTHORISATION

24. Operators of CM equipment are to be trained and authorised. Approved ADF courses for CM operators include the WDA and SOA Program (SOAP) courses and any training provided by CM equipment OEMs or propulsion system OEMs. ADF WDA and SOAP training is to be conducted in two phases as follows:

  1. Phase 1. Conducted at Non Destructive Testing and Composite Technologies (NDT&CT) to prepare personnel for employment at a Condition Monitoring Centre (CMC). A one-week period for WDA and a two‑week period for SOA. Certificates of Training are issued after successful completion.
  2. Phase 2. Involves On the Job Experience (OJE) conducted at the members CMC or AMO to consolidate Phase 1 training and enable members to operate without supervision. CM Operators should maintain a logbook of all CM activities performed.

Condition Monitoring Operator Authorisation

25. The CM supervisor is responsible for authorising suitably trained technicians as CM operators once satisfied that CM duties could be performed unsupervised. Completed successful training is to be reflected in the respective CM Operators record of training and employment document in accordance with local AMO procedures. NDT&CT maintains a register of qualified CM Operators (for WDA and SOAP only) and is to be notified when OJE is complete.

Condition Monitoring Supervisor Authorisation

26. CM supervisors are specialised on aircraft Oil Debris Analysis programs on which they have gained CM operator experience. The time required for a CM operator to gain the necessary experience before progressing to CM supervisor depends on the individual and is determined by the appropriate AMO authority, typically the OIC of the respective CMC. A period no less than twelve months is recommended. CM supervisor may perform CM Operator duties and manage CMCs. CM supervisors are authorised in their qualification records in accordance with local AMO procedures.

27. NDT&CT can provide informal training on the use of SEM–EDX equipment. The Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) Platform Sciences Laboratory (PSL) can provide informal training in PM and VA upon request, through DAVENG–DGTA.

28. Funding for all CM related training is the responsibility of the respective AMO and SPO.

CONDITION MONITORING DATA MANAGEMENT

29. CM data needs to be collected analysed and stored for future trending and health/condition assessment. To rationalise this activity at a particular base, it may be prudent to have a central Condition Monitoring Centre (CMC) which can then provide advice to AMOs and SPOs regarding the condition of propulsion systems in operation.

30. The aircraft Planned Servicing Schedule (PSS) and maintenance publications are to specify under what circumstances CM data is to be collected. CM data is normally required:

  1. for routine analysis as specified in the aircraft PSS
  2. after the installation of new, overhauled or repaired propulsion systems
  3. when oil filters indicate they have gone into bypass (SOA/WDA)
  4. when contamination of the lubrication system is suspected (SOA/WDA)
  5. as a result of an aircraft incident, accident or defect investigation requirement
  6. as directed by the responsible AMO
  7. as directed by the responsible SPO.

Procedures

31. In consultation with each other, the responsible SPO, AMOs and CMCs are to develop and promulgate approved procedures either in local instructions or in the relevant PSS for the collection of CM data. The procedures will need to be more elaborate for WDA and SOA programs to ensure that samples are not contaminated. Procedures should detail:

  1. what information is to be recorded
  2. who is responsible for recording the information, eg person collecting sample, person performing analysis
  3. how the information is to be recorded, eg manual form, computer spreadsheet or database.

32. Data format may vary from hardcopy forms with manually recorded results to electronic databases that can also trend results. CM data may include, but not be limited to:

  1. performance check results and trends
  2. SOAP results and trends
  3. WDA results (metal particles, SEM–EDX reports)
  4. deeper maintenance condition reports
  5. deeper maintenance test reports
  6. RVI results (manual sketches or digital images)
  7. defect reports.

33. Deeper maintenance facilities (government and contractor) shall produce CM reports to support the post mortem phase of the CM philosophy. Recurring faults may warrant technical build improvement/modification to reduce maintenance costs and improve system reliability.

34. As a minimum, all CM data shall be recorded with the following generic information:

  1. aircraft type and serial number, eg F–111 A08–272
  2. propulsion system type and serial number, eg TF30–P–109 SN P71–6577
  3. aircraft Time Since New (TSN)
  4. propulsion system TSN, time since overhaul (TSO) and time since bay service/hot section inspection
  5. the location from which any samples are taken, eg engine oil filter, engine magnetic plug No 4
  6. the details of the maintenance personnel/CM operator who collected the sample/data
  7. the date the sample/data was collected
  8. the reason the sample/data was taken, eg scheduled special servicing, chip detector light illumination, oil filter gone into bypass etc
  9. the total quantity of top-up oil added since the last sample for SOAP samples
  10. the defect report details if applicable.

35. CM data should be collated against each propulsion system serial number and stored on a specific engine/TX file. Electronic databases should be employed where possible to make the data collection and trending process as efficient as possible. A central agency at the aircraft SPO should also keep copies of engine/TX files containing CM data so that the SPO has a fleet-wide perspective of propulsion system ‘health’. If there is a concern about the accuracy of a result, eg unusually high trends, check samples (for SOA and WDA) should be taken and processed in a timely manner to support engineering decisions.

CONDITION MONITORING ALERT LEVELS AND CODES

36. CM alert levels are either defined by the OEM in maintenance manuals or may need to be developed locally based on in-service experience. Alert levels are used to indicate when more detailed analysis is required, such as forwarding WDA samples for SEM–EDX analysis. The alert level may also dictate more stringent monitoring by reducing the normal CM data collection interval. Ideally, more stringent monitoring will enable faults to be managed before in-service failure. The following alert levels can be used to manage CM data collection and analysis:

  1. abnormal
  2. warning
  3. unserviceable.

37. Alert levels for some techniques may be objective in that they are based on discrete data (eg ppm limits for SOA, temperature and pressure limits for PM, vibration amplitude for VA). Qualitative WDA is a more subjective technique that will not include discrete data but will require a subjective assessment of the debris morphology (size, shape, markings and colour). Quantitative WDA may require the use of specific levels based on debris quantity per hour (DQ/HR), refer to Annex B for details.

38. Alert levels may include codes, which can serve as a status indicator for the various stages of failure mode progression. A description of this code system needs to be included in the respective CMPP. A recommended code system typically adopted for SOA and WDA programs is as follows:

  1. R—Routine, ie routine sampling in accordance with applicable Weapons System TMP, system condition is normal and within limits.
  2. C—Sample at twice routine frequency, system condition has progressed above the abnormal alert level.
  3. B—Sample after every flight or ground run. Do not fly the aircraft until the results are known. System condition has progressed to the warning alert level.
  4. A—Sample after next flight or ground run. Confirmation of a suspect sample or an uncharacteristic condition that has exceeded above the abnormal alert level.

39. SPOs are responsible for ensuring that alert levels and codes are applicable to ADF aircraft and CM equipment. This is particularly important for SOA programs, which may prescribe US Joint Oil Analysis Program (JOAP) limits that may not be applicable to ADF aircraft and SOAP equipment. NDT&CT–DGTA and DSTO–PSL can provide advice on the applicability of CM limits.

40. When analysing data, assurance checks should be applied when data appears uncharacteristic. Additionally, multiple techniques should be used to complement each other before deciding to remove propulsion systems based on the results of one technique.

Defect Reports

41. To enable the responsible SPO to evaluate the effectiveness of their CM programs, whenever a defect report is raised for a propulsion system exceeding alert levels, the CMC is to provide the responsible SPO weapon system engineer with a copy of the relevant CM data and trending results.

ENGINEERING DECISIONS

42. CM data and trends should be able to assist management with prescribing a maintenance activity prior to in-service failure. Maintenance prescription may include removal of a system that is trending towards failure or the collection of more CM data over shorter intervals. The SMM or delegate at the applicable AMO is responsible for determining the serviceability of propulsion systems based on the assessment of all available technical information. The types of information may include but not be limited to:

  1. magnetic chip detector indications
  2. lubrication system oil filter debris
  3. SOAP results
  4. SEM–EDX analysis results
  5. VA results
  6. pilot reports, eg noise levels and cockpit instrument readings
  7. technical investigations, reports and advice from the responsible SPO or other CM authorities
  8. maintenance history of the part in question.

CONDITION MONITORING PROGRAM REVIEWS

43. CM programs should be reviewed at least once every two years to confirm their effectiveness from a technical airworthiness and economic perspective. The applicable SPO is responsible for ensuring the effectiveness of respective CM programs through the monitoring of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), reviewing of maintenance procedures, and CM data management. DSTO can provide advice for SPOs when reviewing the effectiveness of current programs.

Key Performance Indicators

44. The effectiveness of a CM program needs to be monitored to confirm that particular faults are being detected before in service failure or conversely, to confirm whether a particular technique is not useful and therefore causing unnecessary cost. Acceptable levels of performance need to be determined by the applicable SPO based on their experience with engine and TX reliability rates or based on OEM predicted Mean Time between Failure (MTBF) data. Metrics should be used to assess the Reliability, Availability and Maintainability of a propulsion system. These terms are defined in DEFLOGMAN - Glossary.

45. Some KPIs that can be used to provide an indication of CM program effectiveness from an economic and technical airworthiness perspective include, but are not limited to:

  1. In Flight Shut Down (IFSD) Rate. Number of IFSD per year or per 1 000 h of aircraft operation.
  2. Unscheduled Removal Rate. Number of unplanned removals per year or per 1 000 h of aircraft operation, due to intrinsic faults ie not due to removal for access.
  3. Time on Wing. The average time the system is fitted to the aircraft.
  4. Availability in terms of the number of engines in serviceable stock and the number of AOG reports due to engine unavailability.
  5. Percentage down time spent maintaining propulsion systems relative the number of hours of operation (typically in the order of 10% for gas turbine engines such as the TF30 engine).
  6. Maintainability in terms of the cost for carrying out deeper maintenance relative to the engine hours made available.

46. The applicable SPO should establish a baseline of KPI metrics based on in-service experience, Service Level Agreements, or contractual availability requirements. Where historical reliability data is unavailable, the SPO should begin a program of monitoring KPIs to determine an acceptable benchmark. For new acquisition aircraft, RAM performance requirements should be established by the applicable single service RAM Centre of Expertise and may include MTBF predictions from the OEM.

ORGANISATIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES

47. The effectiveness of a CM program requires the involvement and support of a number of ADF and contractor agencies. The responsibility of each specific agency needs to be clearly articulated in their CMPP.

Systems Program Office

48. The responsible SPO is the controlling authority for the CM Program and is responsible for:

  1. Ensuring the effectiveness of CM programs through the measurement of relevant KPIs and regular reviews (at least biennially).
  2. Analysing CM data and trends and prescribing appropriate actions.
  3. Maintaining a database and logging of all CM data and oil samples taken against individual propulsion systems, which includes analytical results, wear trends and where applicable, any resulting follow-up action.
  4. Forwarding the results of analyses to the SMM or delegate of the AMO, for incorporation into maintenance records/log card.
  5. Reviewing and approving of CM alert levels for their weapon systems.
  6. Providing CM technology specialist advice to the respective AMO, in consultation with other competent agencies (such as DGTA–ADF, DSTO and OEMs).

    NOTE

    In the event that a CMC makes a significant recommendation directly to an AMO the SPO is to be notified as soon as possible.

Approved Maintenance Organisations

49. AMOs are responsible for:

  1. Collecting CM samples and data, and forwarding them to the responsible CMC and SPO with correct information.
  2. Maintaining a register of all oil samples taken for a SOA Program.
  3. Determining system serviceability based on available technical information and authorised limits.
  4. Performing configuration management tasks at the respective Maintenance Control Office (MCO) and advising CMCs and SPOs when propulsion systems are removed or installed.
  5. Ensuring that CM operators are authorised to perform CM tasks and operate CM equipment.
  6. Raising defect reports using CM data from CMCs as required.
  7. Implementing initiatives to manage CM samples and data when deployed to a location not served by a CMC.

Condition Monitoring Centres

50. For economic reasons, it may be more cost effective for CM data analysis to be centralised in an SPO or to be out-sourced to a specialist contractor. These centralised organisations and contractors are collectively referred to as Condition Monitoring Centres. CMCs are responsible for:

  1. Analysing CM samples and data.
  2. Recording and trending the results of the analysis.
  3. Providing CM data/trends and advising the responsible SPO and AMO of any significant results.
  4. Providing CM data and making engineering recommendations to SPOs and AMOs.
  5. Maintaining specific instructions detailing weapon‑system unique CM program procedures.
  6. Ensuring that an adequate number of personnel are trained and authorised as CM Operators and CM Supervisors.

Directorate of Aviation Engineering

51. DAVENG–DGTA is responsible for:

  1. Sponsoring TAREG 3. 5. 5.
  2. Performing the desk officer role for DGTA–ADF sponsored propulsion system CM related DSTO tasks for fixed wing and rotary wing aircraft.
  3. Providing guidance to AMOs and SPOs.
  4. Providing specialist advice, in consultation with other competent agencies, ie DSTO, Aerospace Materiel System Program Office (AMSPO) and OEMs.
  5. Ensuring that an up‑to‑date listing of appropriate service and commercial CM courses and training programs are available.
  6. Providing specialist CM advice for WDA and SOA through NDT&CT–DGTA.

Non-Destructive Testing and Composite Technologies

52. NDT&CT–DGTA is responsible for:

  1. Maintaining a register of ADF CMCs across the ADF and the CM techniques they employ for applicable aircraft types.
  2. Maintaining a register of commercial CMCs that support the ADF.
  3. Maintaining a register of qualified CM Operators and CM Supervisors in the ADF.
  4. Administering and delivering ADF approved training courses for SOA and WDA.
  5. Conducting SOA equipment calibration and correlation programs for ADF and commercial CMCs.
  6. Providing technology specialist advice to SPOs and AMOs on SOA and WDA CM techniques.

Defence Science and Technology Organisation

53. Defence Science and Technology Organisation–Platform Sciences Laboratory (DSTO–PSL) is responsible for:

  1. Providing technology specialist advice to the ADF on all propulsion system CM techniques and processes.
  2. Assisting SPOs in developing and implementing CM programs.
  3. Providing diagnostic assistance to SPOs and AMOs.
  4. Providing related research assistance to the ADF as directed by DGTA–ADF.

Aerospace Materiel System Program Office

54. Aerospace Materiel System Program Office is responsible for:

  1. The management of non-weapon system specific CM equipment acquisition, maintenance and operator training.
  2. Producing and sponsoring publications for CM equipment operation and maintenance.

Annexes:

  1. SOA Program
  2. WDA Guidance
  3. Vibration Analysis Guidance
  4. Performance Monitoring Guidance
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