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S3C10 - MANAGEMENT OF AIRCRAFT EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE MAINTENANCE

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION

EO TERMINOLOGY

Explosive Ordnance

Aircraft Store

Aircraft Stores Delivery System

Aircraft Stores Suspension Equipment

Loading Team

Safing Device

EO CLASSIFICATIONS

EO SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

EO MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES

Directorate General Technical Airworthiness–ADF

Base Commander

Commanding Officer

SMM or Delegate

Aircraft Captain

Personnel Engaged in Explosive Ordnance Activities

Service Specific Responsibilities

LOADING AND UNLOADING AIRCRAFT STORES INCLUDING EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE

Stores Preparation and Loading of Aircraft

Explosive Ordnance Loading Apron/Area

Requirements for Loading and Unloading Operations

RESTRICTION OF MAINTENANCE ACTIVITIES

Mandatory Safety Procedures for Maintenance Operations

Maintenance on Aircraft in Hangars

Prohibited Maintenance Activities

Allowable Maintenance Activities

Stowed, Loaded or Installed Explosive Ordnance

STORAGE, HANDLING AND TRANSPORTATION OF EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE

Storage of Explosive Ordnance

Handling and Transportation of Explosive Ordnance

REQUEST FOR SERVICE LIFE EXTENSIONS

ACTUATED DEVICES MANAGEMENT

Reporting

Life Expiry Details for Actuated Devices

Disposal Action Requirements for Actuated Devices

REPORTING INCIDENTS AND DEFECTS INVOLVING EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE

Annexes

A. Management of Army Specific Explosive Ordnance Maintenance

B. Management of Navy Specific Explosive Ordnance Maintenance

C. Management of Air Force Specific Explosive Ordnance Maintenance

D. Example of a Weapon Preparation Certificate

E. Example of Message Format for a Life Extension Request

WARNING - AAP 7001.059 TAREG VERSION

WARNING

The procedures in AAP7001.059-TAREG support compliance with AAP7001.053-Technical Airworthiness Regulations, which have been superseded.

Procedures supporting compliance with AAP8000.011-Defence Aviation Safety Regulations are contained in AAP 7001.059-DASR

An organisation’s exposition details which 059 version is applicable

INTRODUCTION

1. The majority of weapons systems in the ADF are fitted with, or can be fitted with Explosive Ordnance (EO). The following are examples of the various forms of EO:

  1. conventional bombs
  2. missiles
  3. small arms ammunition
  4. egress system components
  5. smoke grenades
  6. explosive cartridges in rescue hoist cable cutters, cargo hook emergency release, fire bottles
  7. pyrotechnic illuminating flares.

2. This chapter, read in conjunction with DI(AF) LOG 16–12—Management of Explosive Ordnance activities in the Royal Australian Air Force, and DI(AF) LOG 16–13—Management of Explosive Ordnance Safety and Base Armament Management System in the Royal Australian Air Force, prescribes the Approved Maintenance Organisation (AMO) responsibilities and procedures to be followed when managing maintenance for aircraft related EO. These DI(AF) LOG instructions apply to all services.

3. Additional Service specific EO maintenance management responsibilities are detailed in Annexes A, B and C.

EO TERMINOLOGY

Explosive Ordnance

4. The term EO includes; bombs and warheads, guided and ballistic missiles, artillery, mortars, rockets, small arms ammunition, mines, torpedos, depth charges, demolition charges, pyrotechnics, and all similar or related items or components that are explosive in nature. This definition includes all ammunitions containing explosives, nuclear fission, and fusion, biological and chemical agents.

Aircraft Store

5. An aircraft store is any device intended for internal or external carriage and mounted on aircraft stores suspension equipment.

Aircraft Stores Delivery System

6. Aircraft stores delivery systems are the fixed components including stores management items, together with optional fit stores suspension equipment that constitute the various sub-systems provided for the loading, carriage and release of aircraft stores, including EO.

Aircraft Stores Suspension Equipment

7. Aircraft stores suspension equipment is any equipment/device fitted to an aircraft, either permanently or removable, for the purpose of attaching, carrying and releasing aircraft stores, eg racks, dispensers, launchers or pods.

Loading Team

8. The loading team is a group of trained and qualified personnel authorised to load or unload aircraft EO.

Safing Device

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At no time shall operating or administrative procedures be considered as substitutes for a safing device. Safety critical software may only be considered as a software safing device if it has been verified suitable for this application by the responsible Systems Program Office (SPO).

9. A safing device is one which will either, mechanically or electrically isolate a system and render it inoperable.

EO CLASSIFICATIONS

10. Classifications. EO on board aircraft is divided into the following classifications:

  1. Installed EO. EO which is that fitted to an aircraft system or sub-system to provide an energy source and is divided into two groups:
    1. Special Role Installed EO, such as store ejector cartridges
    2. Common Role Installed EO, such as egress system cartridges and fire extinguisher cartridges.
  2. Loaded EO. EO, which is that, either affixed to stores suspension equipment or loaded in a launcher, dispenser or gun feed system for the purpose of release during flight
  3. Stowed EO. EO which comprises, but is not limited to:
    1. maritime search stores containing explosive filling or an explosive component, smoke grenades, pyrotechnic illuminating flares, markers location marine, smoke and flare signalling cartridges—when NOT installed in tubes or launchers
    2. engine starter cartridges—when NOT installed in engines
    3. small arms ammunition for crew survival purposes
    4. EO in its original shipping package, including any applicable safing devices, transported within an aircraft.

EO SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

11. Personnel involved in handling EO must comply with all applicable safety precautions, handling instructions and procedures as detailed in the aircraft / aeronautical product publication, EO handbooks and/or other authoritative documents.

12. Safety precautions and instructions pertaining to OTTO Fuel II are detailed in DEOP 350.001–001.AO.01—OTTO Fuel II Safety, Storage and Handling Instructions.

13. For the purpose of instilling awareness, competence, proficiency and safe handling practices, all aircraft related EO, whether dummy/inert, practice or High Explosive (HE), is always to be treated as ‘LIVE’ and having the potential to cause serious injury if mistreated. Variation to this principle can be approved by the Senior Maintenance Manager (SMM), by exception, to meet operational requirements for handling and storage of dummy/inert EO only.

14. Safety precautions and instructions pertaining to Radiation Frequency Hazards (RADHAZ) relating to EO are detailed in eDEOP 101—Department of Defence Explosives Regulations.

15. Portable Electronic Devices. The use of Portable Electronic Devices (PEDs) in an aircraft maintenance environment is detailed in Section 8 Chapter 2—General Aircraft Safety.

16. Static Display Aircraft. Aircraft utilised as a static display for air shows and/or other public relations activities must have the aircrew egress system safing devices fitted and lock wired into position. Members of the public are not permitted to enter the cockpit of an aircraft fitted with an egress system unless the individual will be a passenger in the aircraft, or where the FEG/AMO has approved a current platform risk assessment, with appropriate controls documented in OIP. Controls are to include, but are not limited to:

  1. Safing of the egress system, completed in such a manner that a member of the public can not remove the safing devices or activate any part of the system.
  2. Stipulate specific required supervision levels at all times during public access to static display aircraft.

EO MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES

17. The inherent dangers associated in operating aircraft fitted with EO require areas of responsibility to be clearly defined.

Directorate General Technical Airworthiness - ADF

18. DGTA–ADF is responsible for the provision and management of the ADF technical airworthiness framework. All ADF aviation EO must be managed and maintained to meet the requirements of the ADF Technical Airworthiness Regulations.

Base Commander

19. The responsibilities of a Base Commander (BCDR) are identified in DI(AF) LOG 16–12. The Base Commander is responsible for monitoring and local auditing of EO safety on their base. This shall be done through effective employment of an Explosive Ordnance Officer (EOO)/Base Armament Manager (BAM) and liaison with Commanding Officers (COs) at lodger AMOs.

Commanding Officer

20. The AMO CO is responsible to the parent Command for:

  1. ensuring the AMO has a formal and effective management structure for dealing with EO matters
  2. keeping the EOO/BAM informed of all EO activities occurring within the AMO
  3. working with the BCDR to ensure EO safety is maintained and that audit Corrective Action Requests (CARs) relevant to the AMO are actioned in a timely manner
  4. authorising the Line Safety Controller/ Ordnance Safety Officer (LSC/OSO) in accordance with paragraphs 36 to 38.

21. For Air Force additional information is contained at Annex C.

SMM or Delegate

22. The AMO SMM or delegate is responsible to the AMO CO for:

  1. the safe and effective custody, accounting and management of EO issued to the AMO
  2. the authorisation, certification and currency of all personnel who handle EO within the AMO
  3. liaising with the EOO/BAM with regard to EO operations requiring base facilities and/or resources.

Aircraft Captain

23. The Aircraft Captain is responsible for EO fitted to the aircraft from the time of ‘Captains Acceptance’ in the recording and certification system. Responsibility is maintained until the Aircraft Captain releases the aircraft to maintenance, or to the next Aircraft Captain when operating under Continuous Charge (CC).

Personnel Engaged in Explosive Ordnance Activities

24. All personnel handling items of EO are responsible for the safety of others around them. For this reason, personnel who have any doubt as to the correct method of handling EO must inform their immediate supervisor. Only authorised personnel are permitted to handle, transport and load or unload EO unless under training and then they must be under direct supervision.

Service Specific Responsibilities

25. Service specific responsibilities are detailed in:

  1. Annex A—Management of Army Specific Explosive Ordnance Maintenance
  2. Annex B—Management of Navy Specific Explosive Ordnance Maintenance
  3. Annex C—Management of Air Force Specific Explosive Ordnance Maintenance

LOADING AND UNLOADING AIRCRAFT STORES INCLUDING EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE

26. All loading and unloading of aircraft stores (including EO) and changing the state of readiness of those stores, must be completed in accordance with authorised procedures. The relevant Force Element Group Commander (FEGCDR) may promulgate additional requirements to address specific limitations and criteria in accordance with DI(AF) LOG 16–12.

27. Aircraft stores are classified in two categories as follows:

  1. Expendable Store - An expendable store is an aircraft store normally separated from the aircraft in flight, eg depth charges, torpedos, missiles, bombs, rockets, sonobuoys, Signal Underwater Sounds (SUS), Chaff/Flares or other similar items.
  2. Non-Expendable Store - A non-expendable store is an aircraft store that is not normally separated from the aircraft in flight, eg external fuel tanks, pods, targets or other similar items.

Stores Preparation and Loading of Aircraft

28. Stores preparation and the loading/unloading of EO to aircraft must only be conducted in appropriately authorised areas and under the following constraints:

  1. Stores loading operations involving EO must be conducted under the control of an LSC/OSO.
  2. Stores preparation and loading must be conducted by appropriately qualified and task authorised personnel. Personnel not directly involved with stores preparation and loading must be kept clear of the activity unless under training.
  3. Stores preparation and loading manuals must communicate all EO and WHS hazards associated with stores preparation and loading tasks. The AMO may choose to stipulate the minimum quantity, composition and qualifications of personnel involved in the preparation and loading task through local instructions.

Explosive Ordnance Loading Apron

29. An Explosive Ordnance Loading Apron (OLA) is an authorised area where loading and unloading of EO to an aircraft stores delivery system, or the stowing of EO in an aircraft is performed. The OLA may also be used for parking aircraft containing EO (loaded and/or stowed) and where sufficient EO can be held for immediate (that day’s requirement) loading and or stowing. The loading and unloading of specified EO to aircraft stores delivery systems is governed by the limitations of the explosive limit licence of the OLA.

30. Deployments/Detachments. When planning for deployments/detachments, the AMO must consider any requirements for OLAs at the intended area of operations. If the deployed base is a civilian airfield, or if there are no (or inadequate) EO storage facilities available, Explosive Ordnance Regulation (EOREG)–Directorate of Explosive Ordnance Services (DEOS) must be requested to issue a temporary licence for the loading and unloading of EO to aircraft during the deployment/detachment. In combined operations where a non-ADF entity is providing the base armament services, the CO must advise the relevant local authority of the EO storage and OLA requirements for the detachment. In such instances, the CO shall also liaise with EOREG–DEOS to ensure that safety requirements are met.

Requirements for Loading and Unloading Operations

31. Loading and Unloading Publications. Loading and unloading publications specify the procedures and inspections governing the safe, efficient and reliable loading and unloading of EO on or off an aircraft. Loading and unloading operations must be conducted in accordance with the approved loading and unloading publications. The publications and authorised checklists must be used by the loading team throughout the entire loading or unloading operation.

32. Approved EO Loads. Except for formally approved trials, only that EO which has been authorised by the responsible SPO in conjunction with the EOREG–DEOS and Aerospace Operational Support Group Armament Stores Compatibility Agency may be loaded to aircraft. Approved loads and configurations can be identified in the appropriate Aircraft Loading Manual.

33. Inspection Requirements. EO loading and unloading operations that involve activities of a nature which present a hazard to personnel, aircraft, aeronautical product and/or technical equipment, either during loading, unloading or in-flight, require mandatory inspections in accordance with Section 3 Chapter 1 Annex C—Safety Critical Items and Systems, and Section 3 Chapter 1 Annex A—Maintenance Personnel Responsibilities.

34. Preparation of Explosive Ordnance. Preparation or assembly of EO must be carried out in an area licensed and authorised for these procedures. Only qualified and authorised personnel must carry out preparation and assembly procedures in accordance with the preparation, loading and unloading publications as applicable. The tasks carried out to prepare the EO must be recorded and certified on a locally produced Weapon Preparation Certificate. An example of a Weapons Preparation Certificate is illustrated at Annex D. The Explosive Custodian Officer (ECO), SMM or delegate must maintain a register of Weapons Preparation Certificates. The certificates must be kept until the weapon is disassembled or expended.

35. EO Loading Operations. EO loading/unloading operations are to be conducted in an appropriately authorised OLA. The OLA boundary must be picketed with ‘ARMING IN PROGRESS’ signs at all vehicular access points. The OLA must also be kept clear of all non essential personnel and equipment. The number of personnel in the loading team must be kept to the minimum required to efficiently and safely achieve the task and conduct necessary training.

36. Line Safety Controller/Ordnance Safety Officer. A LSC/OSO must be in attendance during all loading and unloading operations, whenever an explosive hazard safety concern may exist. The LSC/OSO shall be responsible for ensuring a safe environment exists for operations involving the loading/down loading, testing and changing the readiness status of weapons and other components or systems containing EO.

37. Line Safety Controller/Ordnance Safety Officer/Loading Team—Qualifications. LSC/OSO and Loading Team duties are only to be carried out by fully trained and authorised personnel. Qualifications and authorisations must be annotated on each persons record of training and employment document.

38. Line Safety Controller/Ordnance Safety Officer—Authority. The LSC/OSO shall be authorised by the CO to unilaterally suspend EO-related and other maintenance/replenishment activities which compromise, or have the potential to compromise safety.

39. For Air Force and Navy. The Loading Team leader must be an EO Specialist Maintenance Manager (MM) (for Air Force: EO trained personnel from Armament, Aircraft or Avionics Technician mustering who have completed the EO Supervisor course) qualified on both the EO as well as the weapon platform to which it is being loaded. Maintenance personnel involved in the preparation and/or arming procedures must be appropriately qualified and authorised. Loading Team members may be of any aviation technical trade provided they are suitably qualified and authorised.

RESTRICTION OF MAINTENANCE ACTIVITIES

Mandatory Safety Procedures for Maintenance Operations

40. With the exception of flight preparation and actual flight operations, aircrew egress system safing devices must be fitted at all times, with the Aircraft Captain being responsible for ensuring all safing devices are removed before flight. FEGCDRs must ensure AMOs develop and promulgate egress systems safety procedures for all flight line and maintenance operations eg ejection seats/crew modules.

41. Maintenance is only to be undertaken when two or more independent safing devices are in place that will prevent the inadvertent initiation of the equipment or release/firing of aircraft stores. A formally qualified and authorised person must oversee the isolation or rendering safe of aircraft stores firing, release and jettison systems.

Maintenance on Aircraft in Hangars

42. All loaded and installed special-role EO must be removed before the aircraft is placed into a hangar for maintenance. Installed Common Role EO such as those aeronautical products that are Maintenance Managed Items (MMIs) may remain in the aircraft, eg rescue hoist cartridges. Other Stowed EO, that necessitates a licensed aircraft parking site when in the aircraft, may remain in the aircraft provided that the hangar is appropriately licensed.

NOTE

Life Rafts including Air Sea Rescue Kit (ASRK) are classified as Class 9 Dangerous Goods in accordance with eDEOP 101 Regulation 2.1 as long as the items are stored and handled as complete items and not opened. As such there is no requirement for an aircraft loaded with ASRK to be parked in a licensed area. ASRK may remain loaded to an aircraft whilst in a hangar for maintenance provided all maintenance safing devices are in place.

43. EO fitted to safety and survival equipment as basic aircraft equipment and installed Common Role EO may remain in the aircraft during maintenance, provided all maintenance safing devices are in place and the maintenance activity is approved by the responsible SPO and promulgated in AMO local instructions.

44. In extenuating circumstances, COs may approve EO loaded aircraft to be placed in a hangar for operational requirements, as detailed in eDEOP 101.

Prohibited Maintenance Activities

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Armament procedures and fuelling operations are not to be carried out simultaneously. During declared contingencies this restriction may be varied by the responsible command.

45. Maintenance is not to be conducted on aircraft loaded with or containing EO if that maintenance involves:

  1. naked flame or excessive heat in the vicinity of the EO (exposing the EO to higher than its service temperature limits), or
  2. fuel system repairs, opening of fuel lines or other operations potentially resulting in fuel spills greater than those associated with supervised refuelling operations.

46. All refuelling operations must be carried out prior to the commencement of any Arming or Re-Arming procedures. Circumstances may arise where refuelling operations are necessary on aircraft that have Loaded EO installed/affixed. In this case the conditions applying to maintenance outlined in paragraph 47 must be observed.

Allowable Maintenance Activities

47. Flight servicing and maintenance may be carried out on armed aircraft at the discretion of the SMM or delegate as detailed in this chapter, provided the following conditions are observed:

  1. Maintenance conducted after the aircraft captain has accepted the aircraft must be conducted in accordance with the recording and certification systems approved instructions.
  2. The maintenance is carried out in an approved OLA.
  3. When embarked, the maintenance is carried out on the flight deck.
  4. In running aircraft, aircrew not engaged in the control of the aircraft, must place their hands in full view of the MM responsible for the maintenance operation.
  5. In static aircraft, ‘ARMAMENT LOADED’/‘AIRCRAFT ARMED’ signs must be displayed in the cockpit and at all aircraft entrances.
  6. All armament control systems are selected to ‘SAFE’, eg all armament switches are ‘OFF’ or in the ‘SAFE’ position and guarded armament switches are ‘GUARDED’ and ALL mandated armament circuit breakers are pulled.
  7. All ground safety pins or devices are installed in the aircraft stores delivery system, eg racks, dispensers, launchers or pods.
  8. Guns must be made ‘SAFE’ in accordance with equipment specialist instructions meeting or exceeding the requirements of paragraphs 40 and 41.
  9. Weapon safety pin/devices are installed.
  10. Manual jettison systems are isolated.
  11. An entry must be made in the recording and certification system stating, ‘ALL ARMAMENT SYSTEMS AND LOADED EO MADE SAFE’, with the clearing entry stating ‘AIRCRAFT RETURNED TO ARMED FLIGHT CONDITIONS’.
  12. All applicable refuelling procedures and safety precautions, as detailed in the relevant aircraft publication must be strictly complied with.

Stowed, Loaded or Installed Explosive Ordnance

48. Loaded and/or Stowed EO must be removed from an aircraft not required for further flight prior to the commencement of any maintenance activity.

49. All maintenance, systems replenishment and servicing must be completed, recorded and certified in the recording and certification system before loading of EO commences.

50. All armament systems must be rendered ‘SAFE’ and EO safety pins/devices must be installed immediately when an aircraft returns from a flight with Loaded EO remaining, installed and/or affixed.

51. Maintenance Authorisations. The following maintenance authorisations are required:

  1. Stowed EO - all maintenance activities on aircraft with stowed EO must be approved by the parent Command.
  2. Loaded or Installed EO - AMOs must promulgate in local instructions, the specific maintenance activities allowed on aircraft containing loaded or installed EO. Procedures for minimising the risks and hazards of fire and explosion are also to be promulgated.

52. Where required, Commands will develop, promulgate, and maintain additional procedures to assure safety during maintenance operations conducted on aircraft containing Loaded, Installed, and Stowed EO.

STORAGE, HANDLING AND TRANSPORTATION OF EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE

Storage of Explosive Ordnance

53. Extended Absences or Leave Periods. The AMO ECO or responsible MM must ensure that during periods of extended Unit absence or block leave, all EO normally stowed in Ready Use Lockers and/or Lockups must be returned to an Explosive Storage Area or a Ship’s Magazine.

Handling and Transportation of Explosive Ordnance

54. Personnel. The transporting and/or handling of EO requires the utmost attention to safety. Therefore, personnel involved in the supervision of transportation and/or handling of EO must be conversant with the principles of explosive safety and understand the possible hazards associated with the store being transported/handled.

55. The number of personnel involved in transportation of EO must be kept to the minimum necessary to conduct the task safely and efficiently.

56. Appliances. Only authorised serviceable appliances must be used for the transportation and/or lifting of EO. The lifting appliance must be inspected before use to ensure it is serviceable, in calibration test requirements and is suitable for the intended task. Handling equipment and appliances must be maintained in good order in accordance with the AMO Ground Support Equipment (GSE) maintenance program.

57. Methods of Transportation. Where transport equipment designed specifically for the EO is available, it must be used. If no specialised equipment is available, the Supervisor of Handling, appointed in accordance with Explosive Transport Regulations (ETRs), the ECO/BAM or the Weapons Electrical Engineer Officer (WEEO) onboard a ship, must approve a method of transportation which will protect the EO from damage.

58. Radio Frequency Hazards (RADHAZ)/ Hazards of Electromagnetic Radiation to Ordnance (HERO). Before items of EO are transported, the Supervisor of Handling must determine if the items are electrically initiated and if so, to what emitters they are susceptible. Accordingly, transport routes must avoid potentially dangerous emitters and/or arrangements made for emitters to be ‘silenced’ during transport to eliminate RADHAZ/HERO.

REQUEST FOR SERVICE LIFE EXTENSIONS

59. Requests for Service Life Extensions must be directed to the relevant platform SPO. Requests maybe submitted in facsimile, e-mail or message format. Annex E is an example of message format for a life extension request.

ACTUATED DEVICES MANAGEMENT

60. Actuated Devices (ADs) include Cartridge Actuated Devices (CADs) and Propellant Actuated Devices (PADs) and are subject to lifing criteria, which is intended to ensure their serviceability. Utmost care in the management of ADs is required to maintain the technical airworthiness of aircraft and crew safety.

Reporting

61. When ADs arrive at the AMO they must be reported to the recording and certification system database, giving the serial number, lot number and Date of Manufacture (DoM) details.

62. ADs issued to AMOs must be reported on a logistics system acceptable to the responsible SPO giving details of the unpacked life expiry date. When ADs are returned to the Explosive Storage Area, life expired or expended details must be reported on a logistics system acceptable to the responsible SPO.

63. Movement of ADs whilst Embarked/Deployed. Reports must be monitored for movement of ADs during embarkation/deployment and reported on a logistics system acceptable to the responsible SPO.

Life Expiry Details for Actuated Devices

64. Requests for life extensions must be submitted in accordance with this chapter. If granted, extensions must be updated and the revised life expiry details must be marked on ADs in the same manner as Life Expiry details in the relevant publications.

65. For Navy. Revised life expiry details must be recorded as follows:

  1. Common to Role - AD's life expiry details must be marked directly with a permanent marking ink before issue to the user; eg LX 12/99, where LX refers to ‘Life Extension’. When the size of the AD precludes clear identification, a suitable label with details recorded must be securely attached.
  2. Special to Role - AD's life expiry details must be recorded on the packaging in which the AD is received. The packaging must be retained for ready use storage and return purposes.

66. For Navy. Serial numbers must be marked on ADs in the same manner as life expiry details.

Disposal Action Requirements for Actuated Devices

67. Air Force and Army. When an AD becomes life expired or is expended, the AD must be returned to the Explosive Storage Area for disposal action.

68. Navy. When an AD becomes life expired or is expended, the AD must be returned to the NAS NOWRA ESAS or ship’s ECO for forwarding to the Explosive Storage Area for disposal action.

REPORTING INCIDENTS AND DEFECTS INVOLVING EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE

69. Reporting incidents and defects involving EO issued to AMOs, Ships Flights or installed in aircraft must be initiated by the AMO in accordance with eDEOP 101 Section 1 Regulation 1.3—Explosive Ordnance Incidents and local instructions.

70. All incidents and defects involving EO must be reported to the applicable branch within EODiv—CASG.

Annexes:

  1. Management of Army Specific Explosive Ordnance Maintenance
  2. Management of Navy Specific Explosive Ordnance Maintenance
  3. Management of Air Force Specific Explosive Ordnance Maintenance
  4. Example of a Weapon Preparation Certificate
  5. Example of Message Format for a Life Extension Request
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