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S3C7 - CONTROL OF TOOLS AND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION

RESPONSIBILITIES

Senior Maintenance Manager

Maintenance Managers

Personnel Drawing and Returning Tools

Composite Tool Kit Manager

Approved Maintenance Organisation Quality Manager

AUTHORISATION, MAINTENANCE AND SAFETY REQUIREMENTS

Authorisation to Locally Manufacture or Modify Standard Tools and the Use of Alternative Tools and Support Equipment

Handling Procedures, General Maintenance and Safety Requirements

COMPOSITE TOOL KITS

Construction and Security of Composite Tool Kits

Layout of Tools Within Composite Tool Kits

Segregated Tools

Authorisation and Identification of Composite Tool Kits

Identification of Tools and Support Equipment Within Composite Tool Kits

Tool Control Within an Individual Composite Tool Kit

Control of Composite Tool Kits

ACCOUNTABILITY OF COMPOSITE TOOL KITS, TOOLS AND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT

Accountability of Composite Tool Kits

Accountability of Tools and Support Equipment During Ground Runs

Accountability of Tools and Support Equipment During Flight

Maintenance Following Aircraft Acceptance

Accountability of Large Support Equipment

Accountability of Tools and Support Equipment from External or Specialist Agencies

Deployments

MISSING TOOL MANAGEMENT

Missing Tool in an Aircraft Maintenance Environment

Missing Tool in a Non-aircraft Maintenance Environment

Missing Tool During Continuous Charge

MISSING TOOL TAGS

SPECIFIC INSTRUCTIONS

Annexes

A. Example of a Master Tool Control Board

B. Example of a Composite Tool Kit Local Instruction

WARNING - AAP 7001.059 TAREG VERSION

WARNING

The procedures in AAP7001.059-TAREG support compliance with AAP7001.053-Technical Airworthiness Regulations, which have been superseded.

Procedures supporting compliance with AAP8000.011-Defence Aviation Safety Regulations are contained in AAP 7001.059-DASR

An organisation’s exposition details which 059 version is applicable

INTRODUCTION

1. The use of tools and support equipment on aircraft and aeronautical product must be controlled. Tool control is an essential component in maintaining flight safety by minimising the possibility of tools or support equipment being left in an aircraft and ensuring that only approved and authorised tools are used for all aviation maintenance.

2. This chapter prescribes the Approved Maintenance Organisation (AMO) responsibilities and procedures to be followed to effectively control tools and support equipment in the maintenance environment.

RESPONSIBILITIES

Senior Maintenance Manager

3. The Senior Maintenance Manager (SMM) is responsible for ensuring that the AMO procurement, accounting and control procedures for tools, Composite Tool Kits (CTKs) and support equipment are performed in accordance with the applicable publications and local instructions. The SMM will normally delegate this responsibility to a CTK manager.

Maintenance Managers

4. Maintenance Managers (MMs) are responsible for ensuring that:

  1. the content of a CTK is checked to ensure all tools and support equipment are accounted for before equipment is removed at the start of maintenance
  2. all tools and support equipment have been returned to the applicable CTK by personnel under their control at the completion of maintenance and prior to certification
  3. the content of a CTK is checked to ensure all tools and support equipment are accounted for at the completion of the working day or shift
  4. the content of a CTK is checked to ensure all tools and support equipment are accounted for prior to the release of an aircraft for flight
  5. only appropriate, authorised tools and support equipment are used on aircraft or aeronautical product.

Personnel Drawing and Returning Tools

5. Personnel drawing and returning tools, support equipment and CTKs are responsible for:

  1. ensuring that tools and support equipment are only used on the aircraft/aeronautical product that they are drawn against
  2. returning tools and support equipment to the CTK at the completion of maintenance, shift changes or if called away from maintenance or workplace
  3. ensuring that tools and support equipment are serviceable, appropriate and calibrated before use
  4. reporting unserviceable/defective tools to the applicable CTK manager.

Composite Tool Kit Manager

6. The CTK Manager is responsible for:

  1. ensuring CTKs are compliant with the requirements of this chapter
  2. promulgating additional clarification and/or amplification instructions on AMO specific tool control requirements
  3. managing unserviceable or defective tools.

Approved Maintenance Organisation Quality Manager

7. The AMO Quality Manager is responsible for conducting regular audits/inspections of the AMO tool control system and is to ensure procedures are being carried out in accordance with authorised maintenance data and this chapter.

AUTHORISATION, MAINTENANCE AND SAFETY REQUIREMENTS

Authorisation to Locally Manufacture or Modify Standard Tools and the Use of Alternative Tools and Support Equipment

NOTE

Marking of standard tools for identification purposes DOES NOT constitute modification.

8. If the prescribed tool or support equipment is not available, the SMM or delegate should approve the use of alternate tools or support equipment by local manufacture, modification or alternate supply. The approval process should be documented as a procedure in local instructions.

9. An AMO may use alternative tools and support equipment by local manufacture, modification or alternate supply, when approved by the SMM or delegate. In the event of enduring use of alternative tools and support equipment by local manufacture, modification or alternate supply, a request for amendment to the Authorised Maintenance Data should be raised.

Handling Procedures, General Maintenance and Safety Requirements

10. For information on handling procedures, general maintenance and safety requirements when using tools and support equipment, personnel are to refer to:

  1. AAP 7600.500–14M - GSE Handling Procedures, General Maintenance and Safety Precautions
  2. AAP 7055.001–99(AM1) - Liquid and Gaseous Dry Breathing Oxygen Maintenance instructions
  3. AAP 7002.023(AM1) - Dry Breathing Oxygen Technical Requirements and General Information
  4. Section 8 Chapter 9—Ground Support Equipment
  5. Section 8 Chapter 2—General Aircraft Safety.

COMPOSITE TOOL KITS

11. The CTK concept is used by AMOs for tool and support equipment management and accountability. The correct use of CTKs will:

  1. minimise the safety hazards associated with leaving tools and support equipment in aircraft, aeronautical product and other technical equipment
  2. provide a system for tracing tools to the job
  3. limit tools to those approved for the particular tasks
  4. provide closer control of tools, by providing a means of checking for absence, loss or unauthorised use
  5. reduce the susceptibility to tool damage through misuse.

Construction and Security of Composite Tool Kits

12. A CTK may be constructed in any form, but is to be locked or located within a secure area when not in use.

13 . All oxygen type CTKs are to be constructed in accordance with AAP 7002.023(AM1).

Layout of Tools Within Composite Tool Kits

14. CTKs are to be presented in a manner that simplifies the task of accounting for tools. Tool shadows or cut outs representing the size and shape of each tool are to be depicted on or in the CTK. The shadows are to be of a contrasting colour to the CTK background, and where practicable, to the tools themselves. When a tool has been removed, a shadow or cut out will highlight its absence. Where a tool cannot be easily identified by its shadow, a written description of the tool is to accompany the shadow.

15. If the nature of the CTK makes shadowing impractical, a complete list that details the contents and quantity of tools and support equipment is to be included in the CTK.

Segregated Tools

16. Tools required to be maintained in a high state of cleanliness for particular maintenance activities, eg clean room and oxygen system tools, are to be segregated from general use tools and support equipment.

17. Adjustable wrenches are to be segregated from other tools. The segregated section of the CTK is to be marked clearly with the words ‘Not to be used on aircraft and aeronautical product unless specifically authorised by the Maintenance Manager in charge’.

Authorisation and Identification of Composite Tool Kits

18. All CTKs are to be serial numbered and authorised in local instructions. The parent AMO designation, the serial number and the name of the CTK manager are to be clearly marked on each kit.

Identification of Tools and Support Equipment Within Composite Tool Kits

19. All tools and support equipment in each CTK are to be physically coded such that they are readily traceable to the parent CTK and the AMO. AMO tool coding methods are to be detailed in local instructions.

20. Tools and support equipment that are maintained in a high state of cleanliness for particular maintenance activities, eg clean room tools and oxygen system tools, are to be physically coded by engraving or etching only.

21. Where it is impractical to physically code individual tools or sets of tools, because they are too small or the coding detracts from tool effectiveness, the MM responsible for the CTK is to develop an appropriate method of identification to be approved by the SMM or delegate.

22. If tools or support equipment have detachable sub components, eg electrical leads or hoses that are not easily identified, a list of all items forming part of the complete kit is to be attached to, or enclosed with the tools or support equipment. Alternately, the list may be attached to a clearly visible part of the CTK close to the applicable item’s shadow. Upon issue and on return of the equipment, the contents are to be checked against the list to ensure that all components are accounted for.

Tool Control Within an Individual Composite Tool Kit

23. A Tool Control Accounting System is to be used to track and account for tools and support equipment removed from individual CTKs. AMO procedures detailing the system which is appropriate to the task and situation are to be promulgated in local instructions. The system may take any form but it must clearly identify:

  1. the aircraft, aeronautical product or other equipment on which the tools and support equipment are being used on
  2. tools and support equipment that have been removed for calibration
  3. tools and support equipment that have been removed because they are unserviceable
  4. tools and support equipment that have been lost
  5. tools and support equipment that have been loaned to external agencies
  6. tools and support equipment that have been borrowed from external sources.

24. Tool tags are commonly used by AMOs as a preferred option in conjunction with the Tool Control Accounting System to identify tools removed from the CTK. If used, tags are to be marked so that they are traceable to the parent CTK. If the nature of the CTK makes the use of tool tags impractical, the SMM or delegate is to authorise an alternate tool control system, in local instructions.

25. Tool tags that are used to indicate tools and support equipment that have been removed for calibration, loan or unserviceability, are to be controlled to prevent unauthorised removal of items from CTKs.

Control of Composite Tool Kits

26. When the maintenance environment has a demanding workload, it is recommended that AMOs use aids to assist with the control of CTKs and support equipment. A recommended aid is the Master Tool Control Board (MTCB). The MTCB can take any form but should be centrally located and should provide an immediate visual indication of the tool control status with respect to each AMO aircraft. An example of a MTCB is provided in Annex A.

ACCOUNTABILITY OF COMPOSITE TOOL KITS, TOOLS AND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT

Accountability of Composite Tool Kits

27. The recording and certification system must be used as the primary method of accounting for CTKs used on, or in the vicinity of ADF aircraft. Tool control administration associated with the maintenance of ADF aircraft and aeronautical product is a mandatory process and is to be administered in accordance with this chapter and Section 4 Chapter 2—Recording and Certification of Aircraft and Aeronautical Product Maintenance.

28. When managing tool control for aircraft maintenance activities, an entry must be placed in the recording and certification system as follows:

  1. Paper-Based System. Entries in paper based recording and certification systems must be in accordance with Section 4 Chapter 3—ADF Approved Paper-Based Recording and Certification System.
  2. Electronic System. Entries in electronic recording and certification systems must be in accordance with the systems approved instructions.

29. CTK clearance and closure must be carried out and certified by either a Trade Supervisor or MM. SCTs may be authorised to clear and close CTKs by the SMM or delegate.

NOTE

An exception to Para 31 applies to external and specialist agencies, see ‘Accountability of tools and support equipment from external and specialist agencies’.

Accountability of Tools and Support Equipment During Ground Runs

30. Procedures to account for CTKs, tools and support equipment used during ground runs are to be approved by the SMM or delegate and promulgated in local instructions.

Accountability of Tools and Support Equipment During Flight

31. The use of tools and support equipment in-flight is only permissible when:

  1. required to complete maintenance in accordance with the authorised maintenance data
  2. an approval or instruction is issued by the responsible SPO, or
  3. authorised by the SMM or delegate.

32. The SMM is to ensure that no flight-critical systems will be affected and that no modification to the aircraft is necessary to accommodate the tools and/or support equipment.

33. The MM is to ensure that individual tool, CTK and/or support equipment identification/serial number as applicable is entered in the ‘Details of Unserviceability’ field and transferred to the ‘Aircraft Supplementary Information’ (ASI) section.

34. On completion of in-flight maintenance, all relevant tool and support equipment ASI entries are transferred to the ‘Details of Unserviceability’ field. The ‘Corrective Action’ must be certified upon return of all tools and support equipment to tool control.

Maintenance Following Aircraft Acceptance

35. Maintenance following aircraft acceptance must be administered in accordance with the recording and certification systems approved instructions. An additional entry is required in the ‘Details of Unserviceability’ field to identify the CTK numbers or support equipment used during the maintenance.

Accountability of Large Support Equipment

36. If the physical size or configuration of a piece of support equipment negates the possibility of its inadvertent misplacement within an aircraft and/or aeronautical product, the requirement to control and account for the equipment may be tailored to meet the AMO requirements. For example, the SMM may delegate responsibility for control and accountability of the AMO tow motors to the shift manager. Variations to the control of tools and support equipment from the instructions detailed in this chapter are to be promulgated in local instructions.

Accountability of Tools and Support Equipment from External or Specialist Agencies

37. Personnel from external or specialist agencies, eg Non Destructive Testing (NDT) carrying out tasks at an AMO, may be required to use tools or support equipment that are not accounted for by the AMO tool control system. When the use of this equipment is required, an annotation must be placed in the ‘Details of Unserviceability’ field describing the equipment used. The responsible Trade Supervisor or MM is to check the CTK/support equipment contents prior to carrying out maintenance. On completion of maintenance, the responsible Trade Supervisor or MM is to check the CTK/support equipment contents and annotate in the ‘Corrective Action’ field that the applicable tools or support equipment used has been cleared and closed. External or specialist agencies that do not have a requirement for a trade supervisor to be involved in the task, such as NDT, may use the tradesperson involved in the task to clear the CTK, provided they are of a minimum rank of CPL(E).

Deployments

38. Accounting procedures for tools, support equipment and CTKs drawn for short term deployments, eg overnight, are to be detailed in local instructions.

MISSING TOOL MANAGEMENT

39. When a tool from a CTK is not able to be located, the MM responsible for the maintenance in the area is to ensure that:

  1. all maintenance activities in the area cease
  2. the maintenance area is isolated so that bins or any other potential containers which may contain the missing tool are not removed or emptied
  3. all personnel individually check and account for the tools they are using
  4. the search area and boundaries are defined to include:
    1. the immediate area in which the tool was last sighted
    2. personal clothing, particularly pockets
    3. floors
    4. work stands, work area benches, desks and drawers
    5. GSE
    6. aircraft undergoing maintenance
    7. vehicles
    8. grated drains, hangar door tracks and other floor receptacles
    9. bins and other containers.
  5. the search is performed as detailed in this chapter.

Missing Tool in an Aircraft Maintenance Environment

40. When a tool is missing in an aircraft maintenance environment, the responsible MM is to inform the SMM or delegate and record the loss and subsequent search in the recording and certification system of the aircraft subject to the tool search. The entry is to specify:

  1. the CTK Serial Number
  2. the details of the tool missing
  3. the areas of the aircraft and AMO to be searched.

41. If the tool is found, an annotation is to be made against the entry in the ‘Corrective Action’ field stating the tool has been found and placed back in the CTK. The certification columns are to be completed in accordance with Section 4 Chapter 2.

42. Where the missing tool is likely to delay an operational commitment, the SMM or delegate must inform relevant operational personnel. Where the missing tool is not found, thorough searches of all aircraft and the AMO are to be carried out. Entries are to be made in the recording and certification systems of all aircraft searched, providing an accurate description of the extent of the search. Where tool searches involve the removal of access panels and equipment, separate entries must be entered to record such actions. If the search fails to locate the missing tool, the initial entry for the missing tool may only be certified by the SMM or delegate, who is satisfied all possible action has been taken to locate that tool.

43. If the missing tool is subsequently found after the aircraft has been released for flight, a new entry is to be made in the ‘Details of Unserviceability’ column referring to the previous lost tool entry. An annotation in the ‘Corrective Action’ column is to state where the tool was found and that it has been placed back in the CTK.

Missing Tool in a Non-aircraft Maintenance Environment

44. In a non-aircraft maintenance environment the responsible MM is to assess if a missing tool could be located in any serviceable aeronautical product that has been forwarded for possible fitment to, or use on an aircraft. If this is the case, the nominated aeronautical product is to be recalled and inspected for the presence of the tool. It may be necessary to contact and alert the SMM or delegate in aircraft maintenance environments of the situation to avoid inadvertent fitment or use of the suspect aeronautical product on an aircraft. Where the missing tool is likely to delay an operational commitment, the SMM or delegate must inform relevant operational personnel. The responsible MM is to annotate all relevant aeronautical product maintenance documentation, as appropriate, by specifying:

  1. the tool as missing, including a description of the tool
  2. the extent of dismantling and inspections to be carried out.

45. If the tool is found, previous annotations in the maintenance documentation are to be signed off by the responsible MM and the tool returned to the parent CTK.

46 . Where the tool is not found the SMM or delegate is to sign off the entry in the maintenance documentation, if they are satisfied that the tool is not in any aircraft or aeronautical product.

Missing Tool During Continuous Charge

47. If a tool is missing whilst an aircraft is operating under ‘Continuous Charge’ and the responsible SMM or delegate is present, standard missing tool procedures, as detailed in this chapter, are to be followed. Where the SMM or delegate is not present, the following procedures are to be adhered to:

  1. place an entry in the recording and certification system
  2. carry out a thorough search of the aircraft and surrounding area
  3. contact a responsible MM for further advice and instructions if the tool cannot be located.

48. Where the tool is not found, flying is to cease until authorised by the SMM or delegate. The entry is to be signed off by the Aircraft Captain, with reference to the SMM or delegate’s authorisation to release the aircraft for flight.

MISSING TOOL TAGS

49. If a tool tag is missing, the responsible MM in the area is to be notified immediately. The procedures to be followed are the same as for a missing tool.

50. Tool tags are not to be used for any purpose other than to account for a tool and support equipment that has been removed from a CTK. Tool tags are not to be taken to an aircraft or aeronautical product, but this is not to be discounted as a possible location if a search of the immediate CTK area is unable to locate the tag.

SPECIFIC INSTRUCTIONS

51. Additional individual requirements for AMOs are to be included in local instructions. An example of a local Standing Instruction for CTKs is provided in Annex B.

Annexes:

  1. Example of a Master Tool Control Board
  2. Example of a Composite Tool Kit Local Instruction
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