ADF Separations

As at 30 June 2009, the 12-month rolling separation rates for the Permanent Force were:

Table A7.12 ADF Permanent Forces separations, 2007-08 and 2008-09[1][2][3]
Voluntary [4] Involuntary [5] Age
retirement
Trainees Total
2007-08
Navy[6] Officers 111 15 1 47 174
Other Ranks 751 176 3 308 1,238
Army[6] Officers 276 30 - 134 440
Other Ranks 1,374 447 - 481 2,302
Air Force[7] Officers 193 16 3 52 264
Other Ranks 519 65 6 128 718
Total
Permanent
Forces
Officers 580 61 4 233 878
Other Ranks 2,644 688 9 917 4,258
Total 3,224 749 13 1,150 5,136
2008-09
Navy Officers 139 24 - 66 229
Other Ranks 624 171 - 359 1,154
Army Officers 249 53 1 109 412
Other Ranks 1,361 490 - 504 2,355
Air Force Officers 196 19 - 54 269
Other Ranks 443 68 1 112 624
Total
Permanent
Forces
Officers 584 96 1 229 910
Other Ranks 2,428 729 1 975 4,133
Total 3,012 825 2 1,204 5,043

Notes

  1. Figures in this table show actual employees (headcount).
  2. Classifications are not mutually exclusive, and an individual is placed in only one group. The order of classifications is as follows: age retirement; cadets and trainees; and the remainder are classified as voluntary or involuntary.
  3. Personnel on maternity leave or on leave without pay, Reservists rendering continuous full-time service and Gap Year are not included.
  4. 'Voluntary' includes voluntary redundancies and resignations.
  5. 'Involuntary' primarily comprises members who are medically unfit, unsuitable for further duty, who died whilst serving or who fell into the 'Management Initiated Early Retirement' category.
  6. Amendments to Navy and Army 2007-08 figures are due to retrospective separations.
  7. Amendments to Air Force 2007-08 figures are due to a retrospective separation and a duplicate transaction.

Figures A7.11 to A7.14 show the variation in the 12 month rolling separation rate for the ADF and each Service over the last 10 years. The higher separation rate in 2001 is due to the impact of the 2000-01 Air Force redundancy program. The lower separation rates between June 2002 and June 2005 are due to two reasons: an increase in Army recruiting in the previous two to four years and as a result members being obliged to serve out their initial period of service and therefore unable to leave; and fewer Air Force members were able to separate following the Air Force redundancy program. ADF long-term separation rates typically vary between 10 and 13 per cent. Current low separation rates result from the combined impact of retention initiatives taken by Defence and the impact of the Global Financial Crisis.

Figure A7.11 Navy separation rates, 2000-09
Line chart showing gradual decrease except for significant dip in 2004

Figure A7.12 Army separation rates, 2000-09
Line chart showing gradual decrease except for significant dip in 2003

Figure A7.13 Air Force separation rates, 2000-09
Line chart showing dramatic decrease 2001-2003 then slight increase before gentle downward trend 2007 onwards

Figure A7.14 ADF separation rates, 2000-09
Line chart showing gradual decrease to 2003 then increase to 2007, falling again in 2008