Workforce Overview

ADF Separations

As at 30 June 2008, the 12-month rolling separation rates for the Permanent Force were:

Tabe 4.12 ADF Permanent Forces separations, 2006-07 and 2007-08[1] [2] [3]
Voluntary[4] Involuntary[5] Age
retirement
Trainees Total
2006-07
Navy Officers 152 26 1 91 270
Other Ranks[6] 865 197 - 224 1,286
Army Officers[6] 370 31 1 80 482
Other Ranks [6] 1,582 482 2 422 2,488
Air Force Officers 228 23 7 48 306
Other Ranks[7] 661 95 8 129 893
Total
Permanent
Forces
Officers 750 80 9 219 1,058
Other Ranks 3,108 774 10 775 4,667
Total 3,858 854 19 994 5,725
2007-08
Navy Officers 116 10 1 47 174
Other Ranks 751 176 3 291 1,221
Army Officers[8] 279 29 - 129 437
Other Ranks[8] 1,373 446 - 479 2,298
Air Force Officers 193 16 3 52 264
Other Ranks 519 66 6 127 718
Total
Permanent
Forces
Officers 588 55 4 228 875
Other Ranks 2,643 688 9 897 4,237
Total 3,231 743 13 1,125 5,112

Notes

  1. Figures in this table show actual employees (headcount).
  2. Classifications are not mutually exclusive, and an individual is placed in only one group. The order of classifications is as follows: age retirement; cadets and trainees; and the remainder are classified as voluntary or involuntary.
  3. Personnel on maternity leave or on leave without pay, Reservists rendering continuous full-time service and Gap Year are not included.
  4. 'Voluntary' includes voluntary redundancies and resignations.
  5. 'Involuntary' primarily comprises members who are medically unfit, unsuitable for further duty or who fell into the 'Management Initiated Early Retirement' category.
  6. Amendments to Navy and Army 2006-07 figures are due to retrospective separations.
  7. Amendments to Air Force 2006-07 figures are due to change of separation type.
  8. There were 36 personnel aged 55 or above who separated in 2007-08, but none had 'age retirement' as the separation reason.

Figures 4.9 to 4.12 show the variation in the 12-month rolling separation rate for the ADF and each Service over the last 10 years. The higher separation rate for the Air Force is due to the impact of the 2000-01 redundancy program. The lower separation rates between June 2002 and June 2005 are due to two reasons: an increase in Army recruiting in the previous two to four years as a result of members being obliged to serve out their initial period of service and therefore unable to leave; and fewer Air Force members were able to separate following the Air Force redundancy program. Long-term separation rates typically vary between 11 and 13 per cent. Rates outside these percentages are caused by other influences such as redundancy programs and changes in previous years' recruiting targets.

Figure 4.9 Navy Separation Dates 1998-2008
Line graph ranging between 10% and 14%. Lowest point June 2004, highest point between June 2000 and June 2002.

Figure 4.10 Air Force Separation Dates 1998-2008
Line graph ranging between 7% and 16%. Around 8% over last 4 years. Lowest points June 2004 and June 2008, highest point around June 2001.

Figure 4.11 Army Separation Dates 1998-2008
Line graph ranging between 10% and 14%. Lowest point around June 2003, up to 13% June 2006 and declining to nearly 10% in June 2008.

Figure 4.12 ADF Separation Dates 1998-2008
Line graph ranging between 9% and 14%. Around 11% over last 4 years, decreasing to 10% in June 2008. Lowest point around June 2003, highest point around June 2001.