Outcome 3 Army capability

Capability performance information

Output 3.1 Capability for Special Operations
Performance Targets Performance
Quality Achieve capabilities and levels of preparedness directed by the CDF for military response options with a warning time of less than 12 months. Substantially achieved. The special operations capability was able to meet almost all preparedness requirements for military response options. Some deficiencies in Special Operations Command air-droppable rigid hull inflatable boat and parachute capabilities created some limitations to a few military response options.
Achieve a level of training that maintains core skills and professional standards across all warfare (including counter-terrorism) areas. Achieved.
Quantity Special Operations Command, comprising:
  • a command headquarters
  • a Special Air Service Regiment
  • a Regular Army commando regiment
  • an Army Reserve commando regiment
  • an Incident Response Regiment
  • a Special Forces Training Centre
  • a Special Operations Logistic Squadron.
Substantially achieved. Most equipment availability for units in this output was sufficient to meet most preparedness requirements.
Output 3.2 Capability for Medium Combined Arms Operations
Performance Targets Performance
Quality Achieve levels of preparedness directed by the CDF for military response options with a warning time of less than 12 months, including the provision of a battalion-sized group within 90 days readiness notice. Substantially achieved. The medium combined arms operations capability met most allocated preparedness requirements for military response options in this reporting period. Personnel deficiencies in key trade areas, a high level of operational commitment for ASLAVs, and the introduction of M1 Abrams, coupled with a shortage of parts and Abrams key trade personnel affected preparedness levels for some contingency response options. Ongoing commitments of force elements for the Reconstruction Task Force in Afghanistan and the Security Detachment in Baghdad were maintained. Equipment and personnel shortages continue to be addressed with new retention and recruiting initiatives and the introduction of upgraded ASLAVs, along with new Bushmaster vehicles and Abrams main battle tanks. Additional projects will deliver upgraded armoured personnel carriers in the near future.
Achieve a level of training that maintains core skills and professional standards across all warfare areas. Partially achieved. A number of training activities were reduced in scope due to operational commitments. Personnel shortages in a number of key trades and equipment deficiencies continue to affect the achievement of some core skills. Artillery and Air Defence Units were deployed in an Infantry role to East Timor and Solomon Islands which reduced their collective training in their normal roles.
Quantity 1st Brigade, comprising:
  • a brigade headquarters
  • a tank regiment
  • a cavalry regiment
  • a medium artillery regiment
  • a combat engineer regiment
  • a combat signal regiment
  • a mechanised infantry battalion
  • a combat service support battalion.
Substantially achieved. The medium combined arms operations capability continued to have deficiencies in personnel and equipment holdings that affected its capacity to complete all required tasks. Initiatives have been instituted to mitigate both of these shortcomings.
Output 3.3 Capability for Light Combined Arms Operations
Performance Targets Performance
Quality Achieve levels of preparedness directed by the CDF for military response options with a warning time of less than 12 months, including the provision of a battalion-sized group within 90 days readiness notice. Achieved. This capability provided force elements for the Baghdad Security Detachment and for operations in Iraq, Solomon Islands, and East Timor.
Achieve a level of training that maintains core skills and professional standards across all warfare areas. Substantially achieved. Most training requirements were met. Airborne, airmobile and amphibious training continued to be restricted due to reduced availability of joint assets as a result of operational commitments.
Quantity 3rd Brigade, comprising:
  • a brigade headquarters
  • an armoured personnel carrier squadron
  • a field artillery regiment
  • a combat engineer regiment
  • a combat signal regiment
  • three infantry battalions
  • a combat service support battalion.
Substantially achieved. Due to operational tempo, some personnel and equipment availability for units in this output were not sufficient to meet all preparedness requirements.
Output 3.4 Capability for Army Aviation Operations
Performance Targets Performance
Quality Achieve levels of preparedness directed by the CDF for military response options with a warning time of less than 12 months. Substantially achieved. Almost all levels of preparedness for military response options were met. Certain deficiencies in the SA-70 Black Hawk helicopter resulted in some limitations to a few response options. The capability also continued to acquire the armed reconnaissance helicopter and multi-role helicopter assets.
Achieve a level of training that maintains core skills and professional standards across all warfare areas. Achieved. The capability has been heavily committed to operations both offshore and domestically, which has provided the opportunity to practise core skills and professional standards across most warfare areas.
Quantity 34 S-70A9 Black Hawk - 7,500 flying hours Substantially achieved. 84.6 per cent (6,348 flying hours). Black Hawk flying hours have not been achieved due to deep maintenance capacity limitations.
41 B-206 Kiowa - 8,750 (10,000[1]) flying hours Substantially achieved. 82.4 per cent (7,212 flying hours). Kiowa flying hours are decreasing as the aircraft is progressively withdrawn from service.
6 CH-47D Chinook - 1,270 flying hours Substantially achieved. 90 per cent (1,143 flying hours).
25 UH-1H Iroquois - 500 flying hours Substantially achieved. 90.2 per cent (451 flying hours). Iroquois was withdrawn from service in September 2007.
14 ARH Tiger - 1,010 flying hours Achieved. 98.4 per cent (994 flying hours). ARH pilot training flying hours are steadily increasing as planned.
2 MRH-90 - 200 flying hours Not Achieved. 7 per cent (14 flying hours). First two aircraft are undertaking test and evaluation activities.
3 B-300 King Air - 2,100 (2,000[1]) flying hours Achieved. 100.6 per cent (2,113 flying hours).

Note

  1. As initially estimated in the Portfolio Budget Statements 2007-08.
Output 3.5 Capability for Ground-Based Air Defence
Performance Targets Performance
Quality Achieve levels of preparedness directed by the CDF for military response options with a warning time of less than 12 months. Partially achieved. The ground-based air defence capability was unable to meet all preparedness requirements as directed in the military response options. The introduction of upgraded RBS-70 and radar capability and shortcomings with RBS-70 ammunition clearances affected the ability to meet all preparedness levels. These issues are close to resolution.
Achieve a level of training that maintains core skills and professional standards across all warfare areas. Partially Achieved. Most training activities were achieved however operational commitments to Operations Astute and Resolute impacted on collective training.
Quantity An Air Defence Regiment. Partially achieved. Due to upgrades in equipment, the Army was only able to provide a reduced capability in 2007-08.
Output 3.6 Capability for Combat Support Operations
Performance Targets Performance
Quality Achieve levels of preparedness directed by the CDF for military response options with a warning time of less than 12 months. Substantially achieved. The capability met most preparedness requirements as directed in the military response options, due to continued deficiencies in critical trades for some preparedness requirements. These shortfalls are being addressed through the critical trade remediation plan and retention initiatives. Equipment deficiencies and the introduction of new capabilities such as the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and protected Engineering vehicles are being resolved through new acquisition projects and the limited redistribution of assets. The available capability provided significant support to forces deployed on operations throughout the year in all theatres.
Achieve a level of training that maintains core skills and professional standards across all warfare areas. Substantially achieved. Operational deployments and shortfalls in personnel in critical trades affected the achievement of some training requirements.
Quantity Combat support units include:
  • a surveillance and target acquisition regiment
  • an engineer support regiment headquarters
  • two Army Reserve engineer construction regiments
  • two Regular Army engineer construction squadrons
  • a construction engineer works section
  • a topographical survey squadron
  • a signals regiment
  • an intelligence battalion
  • a military police battalion
  • a combat training centre.
Substantially achieved. The combat support operations capability had sufficient personnel and equipment to provide a reduced, yet credible, capability. Partially achieved for one Intelligence Battalion due to operational tempo and a shortage of critical personnel.
Output 3.7 Capability for Regional Surveillance
Performance Targets Performance
Quality Achieve levels of preparedness directed by the CDF for military response options with a warning time of less than 12 months. Achieved. The three regional force surveillance units provided support to border protection operations in support of Operation Resolute.
Achieve a level of training that maintains core skills and professional standards across all warfare areas. Achieved.
Quantity Three regional force surveillance units. Achieved.
Output 3.8 Capability for Operational Logistic Support to Land Forces
Performance Targets Performance
Quality Achieve levels of preparedness directed by the CDF for military response options with a warning time of less than 12 months. Partially achieved. The capability provided significant support to forces deployed on operations throughout the reporting period in all theatres. A substantial number of logistic personnel were deployed to support relief operations in the Middle East and East Timor, as well as providing personnel to train elements of the Iraqi Army. The training support has now concluded. As a result of the continued support to operations and personnel shortfalls in critical trades, the capability was unable to meet all preparedness requirements as directed in the military response options.
Achieve a level of training that maintains core skills and professional standards across all warfare areas. Partially achieved. Operational deployments, limited exercise opportunities, and personnel deficiencies in a number of key trades affected the achievement of all training requirements.
Quantity 17 Combat Service Support Brigade and its integral logistic support units including:
  • two logistic force headquarters
  • a signals regiment
  • two regular Army and one Army Reserve force support battalions
  • a personnel support battalion
  • two integrated and one Army Reserve health support battalions
  • a psychology unit.
Partially achieved. The logistic support capability had insufficient personnel and equipment to achieve all of the tasks required of it. A reduced yet credible level of capability was maintained.
Output 3.9 Capability for Motorised Combined Arms Operations
Performance Targets Performance
Quality Achieve levels of preparedness directed by the CDF for military response options with a warning time of less than 12 months, including the provision of a battalion-sized group within 90 days readiness notice. Partially achieved. The motorised combined arms operations capability is growing, with limitations from the ongoing requirement for the Army to provide elements of the 6th Battalion and 2nd/14th Light Horse Regiment to support operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Accordingly, the capability was not able to meet all military response options due to an equipment shortage with large numbers of Bushmasters and ASLAVs deployed to the Middle East and personnel shortfalls in key trades. These issues continue to impact on the raise, train and sustain requirements necessary to fully develop the motorised combined arms capability. These issues are being addressed through retention and recruiting programs and through the redistribution and acquisition of new equipment including Bushranger vehicles and upgrade of the ASLAV fleet.
Achieve a level of training that maintains core skills and professional standards across all warfare areas. Partially Achieved. Most training activities for the 6th Battalion were unable to be completed due to operational commitments. Most activities for 2nd/14th collective training were reduced in scope due to operational commitments, and deficiencies in equipment and numbers of personnel deployed.
Quantity 7th Brigade, comprising:
  • a brigade headquarters
  • a cavalry regiment
  • a field artillery regiment
  • a combat engineer regiment
  • a signal squadron
  • a combat signal regiment
  • a motorised infantry battalion
  • two reserve infantry battalions
  • a combat service support battalion.
Substantially Achieved. Most units achieved the required staffing levels and provided a credible level of preparedness, proven by the assumption of Ready Battalion Group requirements. Partially Achieved for the motorised infantry battalion due to shortages of Bushmaster vehicles.
Output 3.10 Capability for Protective Operations
Performance Targets Performance
Quality Achieve levels of preparedness directed by the CDF for military response options with a warning time of less than 12 months. Substantially Achieved. The protective operations capability achieved almost all the levels of preparedness directed for the Reserve Response Forces. A shortage of personnel to man High Readiness Response Groups was in effect until December 2007. Outputs provided personnel for the transit security element in support of border security operations, provided a company for security tasks in Solomon Islands and a company in Butterworth, Malaysia. The output also provided personnel to supplement Regular Army units both in Australia and on operations.
Achieve a level of training that maintains core skills and professional standards across all warfare areas. Partially Achieved. Most training activities were successfully conducted. Some collective training activities had to be reduced in scope due to circumstances such as the cancellation of Regular Army and overseas exchange exercises.
Quantity The 4th, 5th, 8th, 9th, 11th and 13th Brigades, each comprising:
  • a Brigade headquarters
  • two infantry battalions
  • combat and logistic support units.
Partially Achieved. Some Reserve Response Forces were provided during the reporting period. Despite personnel shortfalls within the capability, the Reserves were still able to provide a reinforcement capability for the combat force component of the Army.